Marselisborg Palace

Aarhus, Denmark

In 1661, a debt-ridden King Frederik III had to hand over to one of his creditors, the Dutch merchant Gabriel Marselis, one of the crown properties in Jutland-an estate called Havreballegaard. Two of the merchant’s sons moved to Denmark and settled in the Aarhus area. One son, Constantin Marselis, later got Havreballegaard raised to the status of a baronetcy called Marselisborg. He died childless and entrusted the baronetcy to Christian V. The king gave the estate to his son, Ulrik Christian Gyldenløve.

In the following centuries, there was a series of different owners. The city of Aarhus bought the Marselisborg estate in 1896, and in 1898, a portion of the park was given to the newly-married crown prince couple, Prince Christian (X) and Princess Alexandrine, as a wedding present from Jutlanders. As a part of the gift, the architect Hack Kampmann built, between 1899 and 1902, the existing Marselisborg Palace, which became the crown prince couple’s summer residence. In 1967, King Frederik IX transferred the palace to the then-throne heir, Princess Margrethe, and Prince Henrik, and today, the Royal Couple still use the palace as a summer residence.

The approximately 13 hectare-large park and was laid out by the landscape architect L. Christian Diedrichsen in traditional English style with large sweeping lawns surrounded by trees, small ponds and shrub-covered slopes. In addition, the park contains a number of artworks, a rose garden and a herb garden. The palace is not open to the public, but the park is open for public use when the Royal Family is not in residence at the palace. There is a changing of the guards ceremony with the Royal Life Guard at noon during periods when The Queen is staying at the palace.

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Address

Kongevejen 100, Aarhus, Denmark
See all sites in Aarhus

Details

Founded: 1899-1902
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roseann Critchlow (6 months ago)
Very beautiful quiet relaxing place to visit. Lovely garden very simple house for the Danish queen.
Robert McCluskey (8 months ago)
Castle was not open on this particular day, but the surrounding park is excellent for a quiet walk. Lots of art works, flowers, fruit trees and beautiful views to be enjoyed.
Andrew K (9 months ago)
A lovely park with beautiful gardens, playground and picnic areas. Palace gardens are open when the Queen is not in residence. Close to large park and beach also.
Alexandra Debrere (9 months ago)
~15 min away from central Aarhus, located next to a beautiful beach, and animals are really friendly, but they only care about food, so bring some apples and carrots. I also want to warn people that they shouldn't feed deer with spaghetti, because it makes them go crazy.
Oleksii Lynda (9 months ago)
I was walking only in the park. We really like it. Were different kinds of flowers and plantings, interesting sculptures. We had a good time. Beautiful castle, well preserved.
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