Jungshoved Church

Praesto, Denmark

Jungshoved Church is a Danish romanesque church situated nearby the banks of Stavreby cove, on the place where Jungshoved castle lay in former times. The oldest part of the church is built in the years 1225-1250 in late romanesque style, while the last part of the church is built in the 1500 century in late gothic style.

The baptismal font and altarpiece are decorated with reliefs by Bertel Thorvaldsen. The pulpit in High Renaissance is created approximately 1605-10 in the Schrøder workshop in Næstved. Remainders of gothic frescos are visible on the curvatures and to the north wall of the choir. The church is brick-hung and whitewashed.

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Address

Hovmarken 4A, Praesto, Denmark
See all sites in Praesto

Details

Founded: 1225-1250
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mads Peter Trans (7 months ago)
Very historic church from the 13th century, beautifully situated by the fjord and the castle ruin from the same period, st it was already fortified and a strategic point from the 700s.
Jan Christensen (7 months ago)
Fantastically beautiful location and views.
Henrik Forsstrøm (13 months ago)
Flot gammel kirke med fantastisk udsigt ud over fjorden. Kirkegården er virkelig også flot. Havde håbet at en vejdirektoratets som denne havde åbent, men må have tilgode at se den indvendig en anden dag
Hans Adam Sønderby (2 years ago)
A really beautiful church
Morten brøsen (2 years ago)
Really nice church, located by a small cozy harbor. Good parking space
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