Falsterbo Lighthouse lies on the place of the oldest known beacon in Scandinavia. The sea route past the Falsterbo Headland has always been dangerous, because of the moving sand banks hidden in the sea. The first beacon was lit by German monks already in the 13th century. By that time Falsterbo was an important trading centre in Denmark. The beacon was placed at the then outermost point. When the trading became less important (16th century) there were periods without any beacon at Falsterbo. This caused a great loss of ships of the coast of Falsterbo.

In the 1630s the open fires were replaced by a lever light. An iron basket full of burning coal was hoisted up and down by a balanced bar. Hence the light was moving and easier to detect. The coal fire was intensely red and could not be mistaken for a star or ship lantern. The rests of the beacon are still visible as a small hillock of ashes and coal, "Coal Hill" (Kolabacken). Towards the end of the 18th century the lever light was moved to the site of the present lighthouse, closer to the new shoreline.

The lighthouse was built in 1793-96 and the "light" was a coal fire at the top. In 1842-43 the uppermost crenellated parts were replaced with the present lantern. Coal was replaced with oil. The oil was very inflammable and the lighthouse keepers had to watch the lamp all night. To make a periodic light; a screen was moved around the lantern by heavy plummets. Around 1850 a house for the keeper was built next to the lighthouse. At the end of the 19th century another house was built for the assistants to the lighthouse keeper.

Also when the oil was replaced with parraffine and, later, gas, the screen still had to be moved around. When electric light was installed in 1935 the screen was removed and so was a major part of the staff. Only one lighthouse keeper remained. In 1972 the lighthouse was automatised and the last keeper retired.

The lighthouse is 25 metres high and 12 metres broad. Nowadays it has no importance as a navigation mark and therefore the light is not very strong. It was totally turned off 1990-93.

Even though the lighthouse is managing itself nowadays, there are still lots of activities around it. Falsterbo is one of twenty synoptic weather stations in Sweden still manned. The lighthouse garden is the ringing site of the Falsterbo Bird Observatory. Falsterbo is a premier site in Europe to watch autumn bird migration. Every year on last Sunday of August it is "Lighthouse Day". Then the lighthouse is open to the public. Visitors are shown not only the lighthouse itself but also bird ringing and the weather station.

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Details

Founded: 1793
Category:
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

mats lundberg (2 years ago)
Hela området runt den vackra fyren är underbart!
Suzanne Wejland (3 years ago)
Underbar fyr, som även var med i frimärksserien Fyrar. Men jag upplever att ägaren Vellinge kommun vanvårdar fyren. Bristande underhåll, knappt några visningar och en totalt igenvuxen fyrträdgård som ornitologerna disponerar ger ett dåligt intryck. Enda vägen till fyren är via en golfbana där spel pågår. Falsterbo fyr är ett omistligt bidrag till historien om sjöfarten i Falsterbo. Skärpning!
yan dawn (3 years ago)
A nice lighthouse and it just took 10 sek to climb to the top. There even people introduce about birds knowledge. And there are love beach nearby. Great place to go.
Cecilia Stockmab (3 years ago)
Jag tycker ska bevara annars blir dr en svunnen tid .våran historia cs
petra andersson (3 years ago)
Fantastisk natur och avkopplande miljö! Några sälar på det är toppen
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