The abbey of our Lady of Bonport was founded in 1189 by Richard the Lionheart, King of England and Duke of Normandy. According to legend, the King was in peril on the river Seine and made a vow that if he arrived safely (in French à Bonport) on the other bank of the river, he would found a monastery on that side. The abbey was built shortly afterwards with the help of local lords and was damaged and restored several times throughout history. Its closter and church were destroyed after Revolution. It is one of the few remaining cistercian abbeys in Normandy with monastic buildings of the Middle Ages including a magnificent 13th century vaulted refectory.

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Founded: 1189
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jacky OLIVIER (5 years ago)
À visiter
marietherese gosselin (5 years ago)
Beau site accueil chaleureux
Alexander Kalkbrenner (5 years ago)
Tolle Location für eine Hochzeit, toller Park mit schöner Grünanlage. Historische Kulisse für eine schöne Party.
Veronique Buchet (5 years ago)
Calme, architecture, guide érudit et charmant
Anne-Sophie Sarthou (6 years ago)
Magnifique lieu dans lequel nous avons assisté à une fête de mariage
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