Bény-sur-Mer War Cemetery

Reviers, France

Bény-sur-Mer was created as a permanent resting place for Canadian soldiers who had been temporarily interred in smaller plots close to where they fell. As is usual for war cemeteries or monuments, France granted Canada a perpetual concession to the land occupied by the cemetery. The graves contain soldiers from the Canadian 3rd Division and 15 Airmen killed in the Battle of Normandy. The cemetery also includes four British graves and one French grave, for a total of 2049 markers. Bény-sur-Mer contains the remains of 9 sets of brothers, a record for a Second World War cemetery.

A large number of dead in the cemetery were killed in early July 1944 in the Battle for Caen. The cemetery also contains soldiers who fell during the initial D-Day assault of Juno Beach. The Canadian Prisoners of War illegally executed at the Ardenne Abbey are interred here. It also contains the grave of Rev. (H/Capt) Walter Brown, chaplain to the 27th Armoured Regiment (Sherbrooke Fusiliers) and the only chaplain killed in cold blood in World War 2. Rev Brown was murdered on the night of June 6/7 by members of III/25th SS Panzer Grenedier Regt near Galmanche, but his body was not found until July 1944. Canadians killed later in the campaign were interred in the Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery.

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Address

Les Ruraux, Reviers, France
See all sites in Reviers

Details

Founded: 1944
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.cwgc.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Scott B (11 months ago)
I made it a point while in Normandy. For the 75th anniversary of the D Day Landings. To visit the allied and German cemeteries. This cemetery is very peaceful and very well maintained. I had the honor of meeting and shaking hand with four men that stormed the beaches. If you are in the area I would highly recommend paying a visit.
Scott B (11 months ago)
I made it a point while in Normandy. For the 75th anniversary of the D Day Landings. To visit the allied and German cemeteries. This cemetery is very peaceful and very well maintained. I had the honor of meeting and shaking hand with four men that stormed the beaches. If you are in the area I would highly recommend paying a visit.
Hamilton Dispatch (11 months ago)
First thing thank you for this immaculately maintained war cemetery. I was taken back as my mind looked back in time across the land. It must have been hell to fight a up hill battle. Rest in peace all who fought to win us our freedom. Sincerely a humbled Canadain.
Hamilton Dispatch (11 months ago)
First thing thank you for this immaculately maintained war cemetery. I was taken back as my mind looked back in time across the land. It must have been hell to fight a up hill battle. Rest in peace all who fought to win us our freedom. Sincerely a humbled Canadain.
Rick Krause (14 months ago)
Very nice place despite what is represented in a cemetery. Green, clean, well maintained, a minimal of signage - one is left to think instead of being told what to think. There is a paper roster of the interned in one of the small buildings. I (as an American) thought it was a good representation of Canadians with the simple Maple leaf everywhere. Understated with dignity.
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