Château de Fontaine-Henry

Fontaine-Henry, France

Château de Fontaine-Henry was rebuilt in the 15th and 16th centuries on the foundations of an earlier fortress built by Guillaume de Tilly, sieur de Fontaine-Henry, named in honour of his cousin Henry II of England. The château is still lived in by the descendents of its early owners. The chapel dates from 13th and 16th centuries. The castle's distinctive feature is its extremely high and steep roofing, together with its richly sculpted facade. The ground floor reception rooms are home to a collection of fine period furniture and paintings.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cormac S (3 years ago)
It was a very nice area they had on the grounds but the castle itself was average
Zénia Faial Morais (3 years ago)
Beautiful historical château but really "abandon". The castle it self was yellow from the old age and the garden was a little bit haggard. Such a shame
David Lawrence (3 years ago)
Really nice place. Very French.
Alex van Langen (3 years ago)
A very nice looking Château. You can freely walk around the area, though you can only enter the Château with a guided tour. The staff speaks English very well, though the tour is only in French. The guide can provide you with a booklet version of the tour in a number of different languages.
My Canada Eh (4 years ago)
Cool privately owned castle. The tour is however only in French.
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Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.