Château de Fontaine-Henry

Fontaine-Henry, France

Château de Fontaine-Henry was rebuilt in the 15th and 16th centuries on the foundations of an earlier fortress built by Guillaume de Tilly, sieur de Fontaine-Henry, named in honour of his cousin Henry II of England. The château is still lived in by the descendents of its early owners. The chapel dates from 13th and 16th centuries. The castle's distinctive feature is its extremely high and steep roofing, together with its richly sculpted facade. The ground floor reception rooms are home to a collection of fine period furniture and paintings.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cormac S (2 years ago)
It was a very nice area they had on the grounds but the castle itself was average
Zénia Faial Morais (2 years ago)
Beautiful historical château but really "abandon". The castle it self was yellow from the old age and the garden was a little bit haggard. Such a shame
David Lawrence (2 years ago)
Really nice place. Very French.
Alex van Langen (2 years ago)
A very nice looking Château. You can freely walk around the area, though you can only enter the Château with a guided tour. The staff speaks English very well, though the tour is only in French. The guide can provide you with a booklet version of the tour in a number of different languages.
My Canada Eh (3 years ago)
Cool privately owned castle. The tour is however only in French.
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