Brittany American Cemetery and Memorial

Montjoie-Saint-Martin, France

The Brittany American Cemetery is one of fourteen permanent American World War II military cemetery memorials erected by the American Battle Monuments Commission on foreign soil. The site was liberated on 2 August 1944 by the 8th Infantry Division; a temporary military cemetery was established on it three days later. After the war, when the temporary cemeteries were being disestablished by the American Graves Registration Service, the remains of American military Dead whose next of kin had requested interment on foreign soil were moved from the temporary cemeteries to one of the permanent cemetery sites, usually the one closest to the temporary location.

The 4,410 American military Dead buried in the Brittany American Cemetery lost their lives in the area of northwestern France extending from the beachhead westward to Brest and eastward to the Seine and represent 43 percent of the burials originally made in the region. They were interred there by the American Graves Registration Service in the distinctive grave patterns proposed by the cemetery's architect and approved by this Commission. Most of them died in the fighting in and around Saint-Lô.

The design and construction of all cemetery facilities in the permanent World War I and II cemeteries, were the responsibility of the American Battle Monuments Commission (i.e. the memorial, chapel, visitors’ building, superintendent's quarters, service facilities and paths, roads and walls). The Commission was also responsible for the sculpture, landscaping and other improvements. Construction of the permanent cemetery memorial at Brittany was completed in 1956.

The Memorial Chapel consists of an antechamber and tower, museum room and chancel. Typical of the ecclesiastical architecture of the region, it is Romanesque in design. The exterior of the memorial is constructed of local La Pyrie granite. At its east end is a sculpture group. 'Youth Triumphing Over Evil' designed by Lee Lawrie of Easton, Maryland and executed in Chauvigny limestone from the Poitiers region by Jean Juge of Paris.

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Details

Founded: 1944
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France

More Information

www.abmc.gov
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Mangold (2 years ago)
Like the US cemitary this place is all about respect en telling the future generations the impact. To many young people died in this war.
Yves Surmont (2 years ago)
One of the best maintained cemeteries I've visited. The upkeep reflects the respect for the sacrifice of the fallen soldiers. Well done! Then visiting please do talk to the manager posted there to overview the cemetery. Very interesting to learn sth about military cemeteries.
Adam Knauz (2 years ago)
Beautiful and peaceful place to remember the history and to respect the people who were part of that and lost their life.
Swicegood Group (3 years ago)
One of the most moving places I have ever been. I am thankful to the French people who, to this very day honor the graves with flowers.
Jon Spencer (4 years ago)
Amazing place! So beautifully kept and peaceful. Walter was a great person to talk to as he knew everything there was to know about the place. Definitely pick up a brochure from the visitor centre in the entrance as there is so much to know about the cemetery that you wouldn't know just looking around. Walter was kind enough to explain it all to us.
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