Normandy Tank Museum

Catz, France

Normandy Tank Museum presents a great collection of American military vehicles from the Second World War. It is located on the historic site of the airfield A10 built from June 15th till June 18th, 1944 by the 826th Battalion of Air Engineering, to receive the first devices P47 Thunderbolt, on June 19th during the day.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Avenue du Cotentin, Catz, France
See all sites in Catz

Details


Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mike Tupling (2 years ago)
Great museum, many very interesting exhibits. Every time I visit I find something new. The shop is excellent.
andrew kent (2 years ago)
Museum ok but you can ride in tanks nice aircraft as well
Charlotte Fernimen (2 years ago)
Quite a nice, self-guided museum. Enjoyed that you could go through it all at your own pace and spend more time on the things that really interest you.
Robert Fraser (3 years ago)
Great museum excellently laid out and extremely friendly staff. Highly recommend a few hours here if passing as conveniently just off the main road.
Debbie (3 years ago)
We just happened to spot it from the N13 when we were visiting another town, but well worth a slight detour on our return. The exhibition was well set up with lots of interesting, well written information about the American landing in the area. There are also shops, a bar and a pizzeria. I definitely recommend this place
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.