Solidor Tower (tour Solidor) is a strengthened keep with three linked towers, located in the estuary of the river Rance. It was built between 1369 and 1382 by John V, Duke of Brittany (i.e. Jean IV in French) to control access to the Rance at a time when the city of Saint-Malo did not recognize his authority. Over the centuries the tower lost its military interest and became a jail. It is now a museum celebrating Breton sailors exploring Cape Horn.

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Founded: 1369-1382
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Valois Dynasty and Hundred Year's War (France)

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

evelyne francois (2 years ago)
Beautiful museum but closes to relocate
Joana Rubio (3 years ago)
The museum did not interest me as much as the tower that welcomes it
anita lefranc (3 years ago)
I like old monuments but I find it a pity not to have any explanation on the use of this building.
Symon Payne (3 years ago)
Lots of history and displays. Lovely walk around the area too
Kevin Delignoux (3 years ago)
Ok
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