Petit Bé

Saint-Malo, France

Petit Bé is a tidal island near Saint-Malo, France, close to the larger island of Grand Bé. There is a fort built in the 17th century. It was part of the defense belt designed by Vauban to protect the city of Saint-Malo from British and Dutch fleets. This belt also included the walls of the Saint Malo, Fort National, Fort Harbour, Fort de la Conchée, and the forts of Cézembre and Pointe de la Varde; these last two have been destroyed. The forts were built by the Saint-Malo engineer Siméon Garangeau.

The fort belonged to the French army until 1885. Later, the army turned the fort over to the city of Saint-Malo. It became a Monument historique in 1921, but was neglected until 2000, when the city gave a free rent to a non-profit organization for the renovation and visiting. At low tide the island can be reached on foot from the nearby Bon-Secours beach.

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Details

Founded: 1695
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Liza Xx (6 years ago)
There was nothing to do there but the place is just majical to me. Walking around the rocks, the beautiful tide pools. I loved it and hope i am fortunate enough to go back some day.
Jaume Puchol (6 years ago)
Very nice
Bodog Sergiu (6 years ago)
A really lovely place. Full of history, magnificent views and amazing people. I highly recommend it
Erin Urban (6 years ago)
Worth the walk and a slight scramble to the fort. Well preserved and excellent guides. Good view of St. Malo.
Oana Mirza (6 years ago)
One of the most beautiful places I have ever visited !
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