Ladby Ship is Denmark's only ship grave from the Viking period. Around 925 AD, the king of Ladby was buried in his ship, which was 21.5 meters long and 3 meters wide. A burial mound was raised above the ship. His grave was furnished with all his fine possessions, including 11 horses and 3 or 4 dogs. In the bow of the ship lies the original anchor and anchor chain. Unfortunately, the grave was plundered back in the Viking times, so the deceased was removed and most of the grave goods destroyed. Some of the grave goods can be seen in the exhibition building.

In 1935, the ship was unearthed here after more than 1000 years underground. It was excavated by the National Museum and the pharmacist and amateur archaeologist Poul Helweg Mikkelsen from Odense. Now the Viking Museum at Ladby displays many of the original finds and gives an overview of the Viking era on northeast Funen. The new building also contains a reconstruction of the ship burial. It shows the scene as it may have looked right after the funeral, with the deceased chieftain lying on a bed in a full-scale replica of his ship, with all his grave goods, near his dogs and his eleven horses. There is also an interpretive movie about the Vikings' beliefs regarding the journey to the kingdom of the dead, based on Norse myths and the Gotlandic Runestones.

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Details

Founded: c. 925 AD
Category: Museums in Denmark
Historical period: Viking Age (Denmark)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

tinytinchen (3 months ago)
Great museum. The indoor exhibition is not very big but the outdoor area is incredible. Don't miss the burial of a viking ship with his horses and dogs.
Nic Bullivant (9 months ago)
An exhibition and museum with Viking artefacts. The highlight is the preserved remains of a real Viking ship in a building across the field. A replica is displayed on the fjord nearby. It would have been nice to have a coffee but this is not a commercially-oriented centre.
Anya (12 months ago)
The museum is expensive considering the state of the exhibit, which is small and consists of a few artifacts with text on the wall. However, both the real Viking ship and the replica are impressive. There are several play opportunities for children as well as outdoor activities, but these cost 10 kroner per guest per activity so it gets expensive quickly. Mainly trilingual (German, English, Danish) information. Corona pass required for entry. Worth a visit if you really like ships, if you want an immersive overview of life during the time period maybe not.
zhuni (2 years ago)
Nice museum, very nice people. We were too late for the tour, but could see everything regardless
zhuni (2 years ago)
Nice museum, very nice people. We were too late for the tour, but could see everything regardless
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