Lappeenranta Fortress

Lappeenranta, Finland

There have been some fortifications in Lappeenranta city from the 17th century. After the defeat of Sweden-Finland in Great Northern War 1700-1721 Viborg castle and large areas in Carelia were lost to Russia. The military value of Lappeenranta, the new border city, was suddenly increased. The construction of the new bastion fortress was started immediatelly after war in 1721. It was planned to be a part of the new defence system of Finland together with Olavinlinna castle and Hamina fortress.

Russians conquered the fortress in the next war in 1741 after bloody battle. New border was moved to west and Lappeenranta was left to Russian side. Russians settled a garrison to fortress and started to enhance it in the 1750's and again in 1791-1792. After the Finnish War in 1808-1809 fortress lost its military value. After year 1810 it was used as a garrison and prison. During the Finnish Civil War in 1918 red guards were arrested and executed in Lappeenranta fortress.

Nowadays fortress has been renovated and open for visitors. The former garrison buildings are now home to the South Karelian Museum and Art Museum, artists' and craft workshops, Lappeenranta's Orthodox church and parish hall, a children's art school and a café, among others.

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Details

Founded: 1721-1792
Category: Castles and fortifications in Finland
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kaisa Lehtipuro (2 years ago)
Place to visit in Lappeenranta if you want to know our history..
Глеб Еремеев (2 years ago)
Lappeenranta fortress located on city centre. It has many museums and platforms with a nice views. I recommend to visit museum of South Karelia, which have really huge model of Vyborg with 1.5 thousands buildings.
Anastasia Petrishina (2 years ago)
This historical place is nice and ful of culture events.
Sami Kovero (2 years ago)
A historic fortress is the Old Town of Lappeenranta. Nowadays it is a place for two museums, some restaurants and cafeterias and an Orthodox church.
Alex Danilov (2 years ago)
Ancient fortress, nice place to visit, beautiful green view, museums and cafes
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