Mary's Church of Lappee

Lappeenranta, Finland

Lappee church is a wooden so called double cruciform church situated in the centre of the city. The church was built in 1794 by Juhana Salonen, a church builder from Savitaipale. During the years the building has gone through many renovation and modification works.

Aleksandra Frosterus-Såltin has painted the altarpiece, which represents the Ascension of the Christ, in 1887. The other paintings are made by unknown artists. The existing organs are from the year 1967. The church serves travellers as a road church.

South of the church stretches the graveyard, with an evocative war memorial, which features cubist and modernist sculptures commemorating Finns who died in the Winter and Continuation Wars. The most striking depicts a mother mourning her soldier son lost in battle, by Kauko Räsänen.

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Details

Founded: 1792-1794
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sari Sarmas (2 years ago)
Suomen kauneimpia kirkkoja. Hyvä konserttikirkko.
SilentVinyl (2 years ago)
Ihan hyvä kirkko
Henri Muukka (2 years ago)
Kirkossa.
Tatiana Bashinskaya (2 years ago)
Там всегда вокруг велосипедики, велосипедисты и о! велосипедисточки, красиво.
Андрей Ягодкин (2 years ago)
Единственная оставшаяся в Финляндии деревянная церковь в архитектурном исполнении наложенного креста или двойного креста. Историческая ценность. Статуи из льда в зиму 2017-18 года стали абстрактными.
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