South Karelia Art Museum

Lappeenranta, Finland

The Art Museum is located at the neoclassic-style barracks (built in 1798) of the Lappeenranta fortress. The museum has a collection of Finnish visual art from the 1850´s to the present day. This collection includes works by many well-known artists such as Arvi Liljelund, Pekka Halonen, Tyko Sallinen, Hjalmar Munsterhjelm and Jalmari Ruokokoski.

The main emphasis of research and collections is on the Kymi province and the region of the ceded Karelia (Vyborg). There are also some temporary exhibitions.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details


Category: Museums in Finland

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anssi Vaittinen (2 years ago)
Kiva tila.
Helena Kemppinen (2 years ago)
Hyvä paikka käydä kulttuuria kokemassa
Riikka Alatalo (2 years ago)
Käydessäni museolla oli mielenkiintoisia näyttelyitä ja niitä sai ihan rauhassa kierrellä katselemassa. Suosittelen ehdottomasti pistäytymään!
Yago Piotto (2 years ago)
Great but kinda small
Mekki Kiesi (5 years ago)
Well, who doesn't love art museums?
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kisimul Castle

Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.