South Karelia Art Museum

Lappeenranta, Finland

The Art Museum is located at the neoclassic-style barracks (built in 1798) of the Lappeenranta fortress. The museum has a collection of Finnish visual art from the 1850´s to the present day. This collection includes works by many well-known artists such as Arvi Liljelund, Pekka Halonen, Tyko Sallinen, Hjalmar Munsterhjelm and Jalmari Ruokokoski.

The main emphasis of research and collections is on the Kymi province and the region of the ceded Karelia (Vyborg). There are also some temporary exhibitions.

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Category: Museums in Finland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

heikki paulaharju (10 months ago)
Smallish art gallery with some older and contemporary Finnish artists. Good quality art gallery. Pay a visit and have a coffee in a coffeeshop nearby.
Ladys Journey (2 years ago)
Beautifull place
Ladys Journey (2 years ago)
Beautifull place
Ivanova Elizaveta (2 years ago)
Relatively small Art Museum, admission 10 euros (the price includes three more museums, but some of them do not work on Sunday). Recently, the exhibition was updated, now Nytkäys is taking place there, it will definitely appeal to those who are not indifferent to contemporary art. Definitely recommend to those who came for a day in Lappeenranta.
Madlen Muscat (3 years ago)
The Väinö Rautio collection was very interesting and vast..full of expressions and emotions from the talented Vyborg born painter! Not to miss!
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Varberg Fortress

Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

It is currently used as a museum and bed and breakfast as well as private accommodation. The moat of the fortress is said to be inhabited by a small lake monster. In August 2006, a couple of witnesses claimed to have seen the monster emerge from the dark water and devour a duck. The creature is described as brown, hairless and with a 40 cm long tail.