Karelia Aviation Museum

Lappeenranta, Finland

The Karelia Aviation Museum is located at Lappeenranta Airport. The museum is run by Kaakkois-Suomen ilmailumuseoyhdistys ry. The museum is housed in two covered halls and displays fighter aircraft and smaller objects from the Second World War and onwards.

The first hall, the MG Hall, houses the Mig-21BIS MG-127 fighter. The showcases also feature aircraft instruments and gauges, turbine blades and parts from bombers which saw action during the Second World War. On the walls are flying equipment from the Mig fighter, as well as the wing and fuselage fuel tanks of the aircraft.

The second exhibition hall houses a SAAB 355 Draken fighter and SAAB 91D Safir Trainer. Other exhibits on display in the hall include objects originating from the air battles fought during the ‘Winter War’ and the ‘Continuation War’. During the early part of the ‘Winter War’ (1939-40), on 1st December 1939, Immola airfield was bombed by the enemy’s Tupolev SB-2 planes. It was during this bombing raid that Captain G. Magnusson shot down one of the attacking planes above Lake Rampalanjärvi in Ruokolahti. The plane plunged into the lake, in flames, and its observer was taken prisoner at the perimeter of the airfield. Here, you can examine the wing flap and other parts of this bomber plane.

Reference: Museums of South Karelia

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Category: Museums in Finland

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Kontturi (2 years ago)
Intressant!
Eija Simola (2 years ago)
Sotahistoriasta tuli mielenkiintoista tietoa,mitä en tiennyt ollenkaan!Siellä oli yksi asiantunteva henkilö,joka kertoi meille lentokonehallissa olevista koneista-ja koneen osista,sekä lentäjistä!
Jorma Zielinski (2 years ago)
Several former Finish Air Force planes (Mig-21 three variants, Saab Draken, Saab Safir...) and helicopters (Mi-8, Mi-4) on display. Friendly stuff and parking next to the site.
Person Tampio (3 years ago)
Очень интересный музей. Техники не так уж и много, но есть на что посмотреть и где полазать. Да и в ангарах довольно интересно.
Andrey Andy (4 years ago)
Wery interesting for people who have interest to Aviation history and aircraft.
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