Manoir de Vaumadeuc

Pléven, France

Manoir de Vaumadeuc has got its name from the Gué-Madeuc lords who possessed the property in the 13th century. According to the genealogy of Budes Guebriant by Ploughman, the first lord of Vaumadeuc would Madeuc Francis (second son of Roland VIII and great grand son of Roland V). He married Madeleine de la Croix, who brought a dowry of land in Pleven Parville where the mansion was rebuilt in the 15th century. Today the castle is a hotel.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

D16, Pléven, France
See all sites in Pléven

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Valois Dynasty and Hundred Year's War (France)

More Information

www.vaumadeuc.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Corinne (2 years ago)
Very beautiful residence. We spent a pleasant week in peace.
Valentin Dupont (2 years ago)
A timeless manor house with authentic decoration. Ideal to rest in peace. The master of the house will be able to guide you perfectly on the places to see around the Manor. To discover and rediscover!
Raymond Marin (3 years ago)
raymond marin (4 years ago)
Cadre agréable et très calme bien
raymond marin (4 years ago)
Pleasant and very quiet well
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.