Rønnebaeksholm

Næstved, Denmark

Rønnebæksholm estate is mentioned in 1321. It was owned by the crown from 1399 until 1571 while later owners include members of the Collet family who owned it from 1761 to 1777 and again from 1869 to 1994. The current three-winged building was built in 1734 and later altered in 1840-41 and again 1889-90.

Næstved Municipality acquired some of the land and associated farm buildings in 1994. In 1998, they acquired the main building and the rest of the estate. Today Rønnebæksholm Arts and Culture Centre is a self-owning institution and it hosts art exhibitions. The emphasis is on modern and contemporary visual arts.

The park is most notable for the Grundtvig Pavilion which was built for Grundtvig shortly after he married the Marie Toft, the widow at Rønnebæksholm. Grundtvig gave it the name Benligheden ('The Kindness'). It was designed by Johan Daniel Herholdt, shortly before he went abroad on a longer journey. Its design shows influence from English Renaissance garden houses, a rare inspiration in Danish architecture of the time.

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Details

Founded: 1734
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Birgit Ulriques (7 months ago)
Dejligt sted med rar betjening. Fin udstilling. Jeg havde dog forventet flere billeder. Det der var der, var dog interessant.
Peter Ulriques (7 months ago)
Spændende udstilling, men for hurtigt overstået, da antallet af udstillede tegninger/ malerier ikke var særlig imponerende
Allan Høyberg (11 months ago)
Smukt sted både inde og ude. Udstillingerne er gode og afvekslende. Rønnebæk Fælled er osse et besøg værd. Museet er plantet midt i fælleden. Og bagefter en øl på Kongebryg hvor der er sti fra museet hele vejen hen.
Christian Holm Christensen (13 months ago)
And ok museum with modern art. Nice park.
omid khodabakhshi (18 months ago)
Nice place to visit
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