Torbenfeldt Castle

Mørkøv, Denmark

The origin of the name Torbemfeldt is unclear but it may refer to Torben Nielsen (died 1310) who was married to a sister of Marsk Stig's first wife. Torbensfeldt is first mentioned in 1377. Early owners include members of the noble Moltke, Gøye and Brahe families. In 1668 the estate was acquired by King Frederick III who renamed it Frydendal. The king died in 1670 and his son Prince George ceded the estate to Christoffer Parsberg in exchange for Jungshoved at Vordingborg in 1671. An important figure in the central administration, Parsberg was created count that same year. However, he died just a few months later and the property was then owned by different noble families before being acquired by Christian Rosenkilde Treschow in 1873. Torbenfeldt has been owned by members of the Treschow family since then. The name of the estate was changed back to Torbenfeldt in 1906.

The three-winged main building is located on an artificial island in a small lake and reflects the long history of the property. Part of the south wing dates from the 15th century but was altered and expanded with a tower in the 1650s. The eastern gate wing is from 1577 but was adapted in 1755. The north wing is from 1767 except for the corner tower which is from 1906 when the entire complex was restored by C. M. Smidt. Frydendal Church is located closeby.

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Details

Founded: 1577
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

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