Vålerenga Church

Oslo, Norway

Vålerenga Church was built in late 19th century, and was consecrated in 1902. The architects were Heinrich Jürgensen and Holger Sinding-Larsen. The church is built in the Neo-Gothic and National Romantic styles, like many of the Norwegian churches built during this period of time. Vålerenga church is special architecturally because of its asymmetrically placed church tower, one of Norway's first of its kind.

A fire in 1979 burned the church to the ground and the building was almost totally destroyed. Only the outer walls, made of stone, were left standing. Frescoes and stained glass windows made by Emanuel Vigeland were lost. The church was rebuilt, and reconsecrated in 1984. New pieces of art were made by the artists Emanuel Vigeland and Håkon Bleken.

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Address

Vålerengtunnelen, Oslo, Norway
See all sites in Oslo

Details

Founded: 1902
Category: Religious sites in Norway

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gopi Nathan (11 months ago)
Old Church in Old Oslo
Sol- brevivendo na Noruega (2 years ago)
Stunning! The colors of fall.
Lukas Pulak (3 years ago)
Good
SanSan J (4 years ago)
Beautiful place to chill during summer..
Suman Das (5 years ago)
Love this church :)
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