Kantara Castle

Kantara, Cyprus

Very little is known of the Kantara castle's early days. It is thought to have been built by the Byzantines, probably after the last of the Arab raids in the late 10th century. However there are no remains or records dating from that time. Its first mention was in 1191, during Richard the Lionheart's Crusade to the Holy land. It was at Kantara that the self-styled king, Isaac Commenos, sheltered before surrendering to the English King.

In the 13th century, the castle was remodelled by the Lusignans, and during the next few hundred years, the castle often served as a shelter for defeated barons and kings. When the Genoese conquered Famagusta and Nicosia in 1373, Kantara remained undefeated in the hands of the King. It was here too, that Prince John, the king's brother, fled, disguised as a cook, after his escape from the Genoese. The story goes that the prince, having been captured in Famagusta with the rest of the Royal Family, was imprisoned in irons. With the aid of his faithful servant and cook, he escaped, dressed as the cook's scullion, with an old cooking pot over his head, and carrying a frying pan which he was supposedly taking to be re-tinned. After the peace treaty with the Genoese, Kantara was further re-fortified. Most of the castle that we see today dates from around this time.

When the Venetians took over the island in 1489, the castle continued as an important garrison for the defence of the area. However, the art of warfare was changing, and the Venetians strengthened the fortifications at Kyrenia, Famagusta and Nicosia. The castle was abandoned in 1525, though there are records showing the castle as still fortified in 1529. However records show the castle in ruins by 1562.

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Kantara, Cyprus
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Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Cyprus

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3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ertan Oras (2 years ago)
Düzgün yolu ol mayan yüksek bir tepe üstelik turistlik bölge ilan edildi.Mazara güzel fakat Büyükko nuk belediyesi çöp alma dışında hiçbir hizmet vermiyor
Judith Vincent (2 years ago)
Well worth a visit , the 360 degree views are stunning!
ÖZGÜ CEMAL IŞIMAN (2 years ago)
Kültür, tarih, doğa hepsi burada...
MUHAMMET Karataş (3 years ago)
Konumu yüksek soguk biryer kale var
Charles Shoe (3 years ago)
Best visited in spring. Castle with winding stairs and breathtaking views of the Mediterranean Sea. The area is full of solitude. The structure blends in with the rocky outcrops. Green landscape and breezy. Endless blue skies. I could spend many hours here exploring and learning about this place.
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