St. Francis Church

Famagusta, Cyprus

St Francis church was originally part of a Franciscan monastery, and was alongside the Royal Palace. Today it can be found close to the Venetian Palace. It consists of a three-sided apse with a small chapel off the south side. Buttressing supported the external walls. It was built in the early years of the 14th century with funding supplied by Henry II, King of Cyprus who reigned from 1285 to 1324.

Henry's reign was far from peaceful. He saw the fall of Acre in 1291, his own imprisonment from 1306 to 1310, and the disbandment of the Knights Templars in 1313. In the latter years of his reign, however, not only did he fund the building of this church, but he saw the fortification of Famagusta, and the start of the rebuilding of St Nicholas Cathedral.

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Details

Founded: c. 1310
Category: Religious sites in Cyprus

More Information

www.whatson-northcyprus.com

Rating

3.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yunus Emre Korkusuz (7 months ago)
Another historical building that cannot get its share from the necessary care and cleanliness. Outside the garbage inside is full of grass. I gave up its restoration, but it could be preserved as it was.
MG MG (15 months ago)
Right next to the first church in ruins - the church of St. Francis, which is a remnant of the abbey formed after the arrival of the order in Cyprus. The construction was supposedly financed by King of Cyprus Henry II who was in close relations with the Franciscans. Part of the church was transformed by the Turks into public baths.
Emre Berk Ahu (16 months ago)
M.S XIII. The Franciscan sect that came to Cyprus in the 21st century It is one of the most important churches in Famagusta. Church monastic buildings that have not survived to the present day. Large landowners and members of Roman beggars is a sect. Spreading to the island in 1400 It has become one of the major sects established in Cyprus and has survived to the present day. Building the church most of the money spent on France Henry Il, who was in close contact with his priests, It is estimated to be met by (1285-1324). XIV with the end of the XII century AD. Built in the early century It was. Providing financial support in the construction of the church Famagusta, Genoese and others inside the church They were buried.
Dominik Fuchs (2 years ago)
Very few remains and also very dirty in the area. Can you look at yourself when you were next door to the mosque, but is not a must. The architecture is still something special, like the other buildings, of course, but standing alone is not worth a tourist destination.
Orestis Papapetrou (2 years ago)
Awesome Church with a small pub in it but its needs to be clean inside or at least install some grass to look nicer.
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