Kolossi Castle was a former Crusader castle possibly built in 1210 by the Frankish military, when the land of Kolossi was given by King Hugh I to the Knights of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (Hospitallers). Owing to rivalry among the factions in the Crusader Kingdom of Cyprus, the castle was taken by the Knights Templar in 1306, but returned to the Hospitallers in 1313 following the abolition of the Templars. The present castle was built in 1454 by the Hospitallers under the Commander of Kolossi, Louis de Magnac, whose arms can be seen carved into the castle's walls. It held great strategic importance in the Middle Ages, and contained large facilities for the production of sugar from the local sugarcane, one of Cyprus's main exports in the period.

The castle today consists of a single three-storey keep with an attached rectangular enclosure or bailey about 30 by 40 metres. It is a fine example of medieval military architecture and directly connected with a number of important events, which constitute various interesting folds of the agelong and stormy history of Cyprus.

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Founded: 1454
Category: Castles and fortifications in Cyprus

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simon Winstanley (19 months ago)
Beautiful site. Well worth a visit on Cyprus on a nice day. Cafe and souvenir shop located close by.
Александр Игонин (20 months ago)
A castle, not a big one. As I recall, it contains three floors and also has rooftop access. I liked the spiral staircase, and the view from the roof was good... But aside from that, nothing too impressive. You have to pay fee on the entrance. A restroom and free WiFi are provided.
Rock Cyprus (2 years ago)
A magnificent castle! It can actually be described best not as a castle but as the fortified residence of the Commander of the Hospitallers, who oversaw and managed the sugar cane plantations around the Colossi area. The main building has 3 floors, and dates from the 15th Century, while the foundations of an earlier structure have been excavated and unearthed in the west side of the complex. The main building has been wonderfully restored in 1933 and it is a joy to visit. The visitor’s leaflet provides very good information that you can use in order to navigate and appreciate the site. Do not forget to have a look at the remains of the sugar cane factory, powered by a water mill (the original aqueduct feeding the mill is still intact). One of the most beautiful sites in Cyprus!
Denis Dem (2 years ago)
Small castle, but well preserved, except interior which is absent. It would definitely win if it was decorated with replicas of furniture. Also in main rooms of the castle can be seen missing wooden constructions that were used to create second floor in these rooms. Unfortunately, they are missing too, what on the other hand allows to see whole room. Also ticket is only €2,5 and a 17 bus can be taken to it just for €1,5 one way what is really cheap and makes it must visit place for me.
Adrian S (2 years ago)
A small castle well worth the visit as it has great views of the surround areas from the very top. Free car park on site. Entry free of €2.50. Definitely NOT recommended for those with mobility issues as lots of steps/stairs and uneven ground. Toilet facilities on site.
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