Odeon Amphitheatre

Paphos, Cyprus

The Odeon, which is one of the most important archaeological sites in Cyprus was built in the 2th century AD and shaped entirely from perfectly hewn limestone rocks. To the south of the Odeon are the remains of the Roman temple of Asclepius, God of Medicine and to the north are remains of ancient town walls. Next to the Odeon and near to the New Paphos Lighthouse is a rocky mound which is said to have been the Acropolis of the town.

Odeon, is not only a tourist attraction, but is one of the best amphitheatre's to stage live musical and theatrical performances. The Cypriot Department of Antiquities has partly restored the Odeon with 12 rows of seats, available for live events.

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Details

Founded: 2nd century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Cyprus

More Information

www.paphos.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dagmar Georgiadou (19 months ago)
The whole area is worth visiting. To sit and imagine how it was like in the past.
Remote Life (20 months ago)
Lovely to see historical area
אווה תורג'מן (2 years ago)
Historical place. Very interesting and educational.
Dave Schram (2 years ago)
The Odeon steps are in amazing shape. It was very fun to stand on the top of them and look out onto the massive field and imagine what you would have seen thousands of years ago! Amazing!
Maia Syme (2 years ago)
I really enjoyed my visit here, sadly the weather was not great but it was so nice to actually be able to sit on it. It's what you'd expect, nothing more nothing less.
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