Château de Mayenne

Mayenne, France

Château de Mayenne was originally a wooden castle on a steep rock built in the 8th century AD. It was rebuilt as a stone castle in 920, but burnt down in 1063 during the Breton wars against Wilhelm the Conqueror. The castle was enlarged in the 13th century. In the late Middle Ages Mayenne castle was no longer used as a a residence, but it was a garrison and magazine. English army occupied it twice during the Hundred Years' War (1361-1364 and 1425-1448). After Wars of Religion Château de Mayenne was in royal possession. Towers were demolished in 1665 and the castle was left to decay. In the 19th century it was acquired by the city of Mayenne and restored.

Château de Mayenne is today one the best-preserved early medieval secular buildings in Europe. From the castle, you will have a magnificent panoramic vista over the River Mayenne and the eastern districts of the town. The main courtyard has now been turned into a park. At the end of the 19th century it was endowed with a superb Italian-style theatre, a hub of cultural life in Mayenne. The castle houses a museum where visitors can take an interactive tour to discover these remarkable Carolingian remains and the castle’s history over the last 1,000 years.

A listed museum Mayenne castle’s museum houses the medieval section of Mayenne’s Departmental Archaeological Museum. It also displays outstanding collections of objects found in the course of excavations since 1996: coins, domestic artefacts, religious objects, military furnishings, funerary furnishings and game pieces.Visitors can view an extraordinary collection of game pieces and counters: a board complete with its 52 backgammon counters dating from the 10th to 12th centuries, and dice and chess pieces, all made of bone, stags’ antlers or ivory.

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Details

Founded: 778 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lesley Burton (10 months ago)
Very interesting, well worth a visit
paul chapman (11 months ago)
A nice way to whilst away a few hours in the city, reasonable priced entry for the family. Would recommend to all, not overly accessible but then 14th century architects probably weren't thinking if this when they designed it
Dan Rack (12 months ago)
Excellent castle & museum, audio and laser guided tour in several rooms. Great facilities.
Michelle Godbold (17 months ago)
Brilliant museum, plenty on interactive stuff for children and adults of all ages. Under 18's free and only 4euros per adult. Well worth the money. Quite a mall castle but the self directed tour works well and you can easily spend an hour to an hour and a half here. Great lift for pushchairs and disabled. Free parking just outside, we were lucky as it was busy. If you don't mind a 10 minute walk you can park on the opposite side of the river in the shadow of the castle for free where there looked to be plenty of room or else pay at the metered parking.
Janet Foxon (2 years ago)
Worth a visit when on holiday in mayenne. Then pop into to the town centre for lunch in one of the great brasseries.
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