Le Petit Mont

Arzon, France

Dating from c. 4600 BC at the earliest, Le Petit Mont is one of the most significant Cairns in Brittany, but unfortunately one of the most brutaly vandalized. The cairn measures 60 meters in length, 46 meters in width, and between 6 and 7 meters in height. It is built over several dolmens with antechambers. The dolmen in the southwest has engravings that include axes in circles, fitted axes, and undulating signs. The Romans transformed the site into a sanctuary for Venus.

In 1943, German troops built a bunker and Flak emplacement into the South East Corner of the cairn, which completely destroyed one of the chambers and caused the collapse of the second one pictured above, which has since been restored.

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Founded: 4600 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Prehistoric Age (France)

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