Philips van Wassenaar (died in 1225) is considered to have been the founder of Nederhorst Castle. In the 17th century the baron Godard van Reede had the Reevaart dug so that his visitors could disembark in front of the castle when arriving by boat. The castle was thoroughly rennovated in the 18th century, and reminders of this period can still be seen on the south side.

After 1945 the castle fell into a serious state of disrepair and there was even question of it being pulled down. However the building found a saviour at the end of 1959 in the form of a moped manufacturer from Bussum who had heard from his general practitioner that there was a castle for sale in Nederhorst den Berg. This artisan, Jan Lourens Jonker, married to Harmine J.E. Wolters, was looking for space for his hobbies: collecting old bicycles and clocks.

After a disastrous fire in 1971, and with the help of additional funding by state, provincial and local governments, renovation could begin. Restoration was completed in 1973. Today the castle hosts a private company Studio Michel Mulders.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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studiomichelmulders.com

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jazz vanKlooster (3 years ago)
Dit is de eiffeltoren, big ben of noem maar op van Nederhorst. Don't @ me
Nico Karssemeijer (3 years ago)
Prachtig kasteel in de omgeving genoemd Blommestein. Je kunt er niet naar binnen maar wel buiten bekijken. Marten Toonder de kinder tekenfilms maker had er ooit zijn studio.
Frank Wils (3 years ago)
Beautifully restored medical castle. Not possible (nor worth it probably) to visit inside because the renovation modernized the inside to accommodate offices. The gardens are open to public and are quiet, relaxing and very enjoyable with some beautiful views on the castle exterior. To bad nobody sells some drinks here, especially in the weekend...
Daniel Wichers (3 years ago)
Beautiful castle in this small village Nederhorst den Berg.
Martijn Seminar Martijn Vervoer (4 years ago)
For parties, events and history, interesting monument
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