The Rijksmuseum is a Dutch national museum dedicated to arts and history in Amsterdam. The museum has on display 8,000 objects of art and history, from their total collection of 1 million objects from the years 1200–2000. The collection contains more than 2,000 paintings from the Dutch Golden Age by notable painters such as Jacob Isaakszoon van Ruisdael, Frans Hals, Johannes Vermeer, Jan Steen, Rembrandt, and Rembrandt's pupils. Probably the most well known pieces of art are The Milkmaid (c. 1658) painted by Johannes Vermeer and The Night Watch (1642) by Rembrandt.

The Rijksmuseum was founded in The Hague in 1800 and moved to Amsterdam in 1808, where it was first located in the Royal Palace and later in the Trippenhuis. The current main building was designed by Pierre Cuypers and first opened its doors in 1885. On 13 April 2013, after a ten-year renovation which cost € 375 million, the main building was reopened by Queen Beatrix. In 2013, it was the most visited museum in the Netherlands with a record number of 2.2 million visitors.

The museum has taken the unusual step of making some 125,000 high-resolution images available for download via its Rijks Studio software, with plans to add another 40,000 images per year until the entire collection of one million works is available, according to Taco Dibbits, director of collections.

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Founded: 1800
Category: Museums in Netherlands

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arvind Yerram (6 months ago)
Undoubtedly the first and the foremost museum we can see in Amsterdam. This is the Dutch National museum dedicated to arts and history. Collection is huge and are spaced far away from each other. That makes it even more attractive. Be ready for long walks.
Shamik Shah (7 months ago)
This is an awesome museum with so much to look at, it was actually amazing to look at all the different years of artifacts and exhibits. It was very detailed with a lot to read. I have to say though you do need a good 4-5 hours in the museum to take in everything. I only had about 3 hours to look at everything so I was rushing at the end and I did miss some areas. But I do recommend his museum
Debbie Tan (7 months ago)
amazing collection!!! we spend the whole day in the museum. remember to bring your own lunch if you are planning to spend the whole day. they have free audio... just download the app on your phone. and is more interesting to listen to the audio ...it made me appreciate the art more Will come back again!
Magda Tuszynska (7 months ago)
Great museum. Very interested. Definitely worth to visit! All kinds of art. The library is amazing! You need at least 3-4 hours to see everything.
Nicholas Zimet (7 months ago)
Wonderful museum with impressive collections. We also appreciate its location being so close to other good museums if you want to make a full day of it. The space is huge though so prepare to be overwhelmed! The museum cafe was surprisingly high quality and diverse compared to the typical cafe at similar sites.
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