After the Oude Kerk ('Old Church') grew too small for the expanding population of the town, the bishop of Utrecht in 1408 gave permission to build a second parish church in Amsterdam. The Nieuwe Kerk ('new church') was consecrated to St. Mary and St. Catharine.

The church was damaged by the city fires of 1421 and 1452 and burned down almost entirely in 1645, after which it was rebuilt in Gothic style. It underwent major renovation in 1892–1914, which added many neo-Gothic details, and was again renovated in 1959–1980. It was the renovation in the 70's that became too expensive for the Dutch Reformed Church, and when they said the church would be closed most of the time to save money on maintenance, it was decided to transfer ownership in 1979 to a newly formed cultural organization called the Nationale Stichting De Nieuwe Kerk.

The Nieuwe Kerk is no longer used for church services but is used as an exhibition space. It is also used for organ recitals. There is a café in one of the buildings attached to the church that has an entrance to the church (during opening hours). There is a museum store inside the entrance that sells postcards, books, and gifts having to do with the church and its exhibitions.

The Nieuwe Kerk is a burial site for Dutch naval heroes, including Admiral Michiel de Ruyter, Commodore Jan van Galen, and Jan van Speyk. The poet and playwright Joost van den Vondel is also buried in the church.

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Founded: 1408
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Todd Schmidt (8 months ago)
A beautiful cathedral that has been surrendered...
Anna yucca (9 months ago)
Really pretty. Sometimes different expositions. This is also the church where Michiel de Ruyter is buried. You can see his monument and casket.
Amanda G (9 months ago)
Beautiful old church rich in ornaments, sculptures and tombs of famous people
Valentin Hentea (11 months ago)
Nice church, nice place around
Debora Rocha (12 months ago)
Amazing the photos are impressive, a fantastic assistant location an exhibition in a surreal church
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