After the Oude Kerk ('Old Church') grew too small for the expanding population of the town, the bishop of Utrecht in 1408 gave permission to build a second parish church in Amsterdam. The Nieuwe Kerk ('new church') was consecrated to St. Mary and St. Catharine.

The church was damaged by the city fires of 1421 and 1452 and burned down almost entirely in 1645, after which it was rebuilt in Gothic style. It underwent major renovation in 1892–1914, which added many neo-Gothic details, and was again renovated in 1959–1980. It was the renovation in the 70's that became too expensive for the Dutch Reformed Church, and when they said the church would be closed most of the time to save money on maintenance, it was decided to transfer ownership in 1979 to a newly formed cultural organization called the Nationale Stichting De Nieuwe Kerk.

The Nieuwe Kerk is no longer used for church services but is used as an exhibition space. It is also used for organ recitals. There is a café in one of the buildings attached to the church that has an entrance to the church (during opening hours). There is a museum store inside the entrance that sells postcards, books, and gifts having to do with the church and its exhibitions.

The Nieuwe Kerk is a burial site for Dutch naval heroes, including Admiral Michiel de Ruyter, Commodore Jan van Galen, and Jan van Speyk. The poet and playwright Joost van den Vondel is also buried in the church.

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Founded: 1408
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Ciprian (6 months ago)
There are a lot of more beautiful churches across Europe.Anyway, woth a visit.
El Capitan (9 months ago)
Always good exhibitions and you feel the atmosphere from the old days
Bryan Steward (9 months ago)
Beautiful historic church demonstrating some of the most beautiful architectural feats. You get to see the church and the exhibits within for the same ticket. Audio guides are available as well. This is truly an amazing site to see. The beauty is overwhelming at times and the architecture and what was accomplished centuries ago by men without modern tools is truly amazing. Make sure you swing in here for a brief go around when you are visiting.
David Granados (11 months ago)
We visited the church during the World Press Photo 2020. The exposition was really interesting and you can get the audio guide with the insights of some photographers directly from your phone. Towards the end there are also some short documentaries focused on current social/environmental issues in different places of the world.
Pablo Podhorzer (11 months ago)
Always interesting exhibitions and handy audio guide. Bring headphones so you don't need to have the audio guide in your hand. If you don't have a Museumkaart maybe it's not good value, but if you do (or any other pass) is a good complement to the Royal Palace next to it.
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