After the Oude Kerk ('Old Church') grew too small for the expanding population of the town, the bishop of Utrecht in 1408 gave permission to build a second parish church in Amsterdam. The Nieuwe Kerk ('new church') was consecrated to St. Mary and St. Catharine.

The church was damaged by the city fires of 1421 and 1452 and burned down almost entirely in 1645, after which it was rebuilt in Gothic style. It underwent major renovation in 1892–1914, which added many neo-Gothic details, and was again renovated in 1959–1980. It was the renovation in the 70's that became too expensive for the Dutch Reformed Church, and when they said the church would be closed most of the time to save money on maintenance, it was decided to transfer ownership in 1979 to a newly formed cultural organization called the Nationale Stichting De Nieuwe Kerk.

The Nieuwe Kerk is no longer used for church services but is used as an exhibition space. It is also used for organ recitals. There is a café in one of the buildings attached to the church that has an entrance to the church (during opening hours). There is a museum store inside the entrance that sells postcards, books, and gifts having to do with the church and its exhibitions.

The Nieuwe Kerk is a burial site for Dutch naval heroes, including Admiral Michiel de Ruyter, Commodore Jan van Galen, and Jan van Speyk. The poet and playwright Joost van den Vondel is also buried in the church.

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Details

Founded: 1408
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Антон Шишкин (20 months ago)
The life of Buddha is a wonderful exposition to see. Nice objects and interesting information, gives food for thought. What I liked about it was that one can make very different conclusions, it's not at all restricted to one narrative. Even not being religious at all I had good time and enjoyed sincere laughter several times about different things, including myself.
Canato Victor (20 months ago)
The church it self is really good. I went to a exposition that was well made but a little expensive for what I found inside. Even I would suggest a visit, if you are reading this maybe is time to get inside. The church atmosphere create a peace of mind, very quiet and good for meditation or pay really attention about what is going around
Monique Mannaert (20 months ago)
A beautiful historic building with good quality expositions and concerts.
David Link (2 years ago)
I'm not giving it 5 for two reasons. It was too expensive and the Buddha exhibition was peppered with random other installations. But you should go see the Nieuw Kerk if you're in Amsterdam. It's a haven in the city centre. Of course Amsterdam is so teeny weeny that pretty much everything is in the centre. Big fan.
Arvin DeHerrera (2 years ago)
Beautiful building. Wish the preservation would have been as a church. Buddha exhibit at our visit. Supposed to be included with City Pass. It was not. €2.50 with City Pass.
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