Amsterdam Van Gogh Museum maintains the world’s largest collection of the works of the world’s most popular artist - Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), his paintings, drawings and letters, completed with the art of his contemporaries. Each year, 1.6 million visitors come to the Van Gogh Museum, making it one of the 25 most popular museums in the world.

The collection features the works of Vincent van Gogh – more than 200 painting, 500 drawings but also works of other artists, his contemporaries – Impressionists and Postimpressionists. Van Gogh's work is organized chronologically into five periods, each representing a different period of his life and work: The Netherlands, Paris, Arles, Saint-Remy and Auvers-sur-Oise. The museum made part of its collection accessible on Internet throughGoogle Art Project.

The modern main building was designed by Gerrit Rietveld, completed by his partners after his death (opened in 1973), with later built elliptical exhibition wing by Kisho Kurokawa (opened in 1999).

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Category: Museums in Netherlands

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arron Beckett (19 months ago)
Great museum to visit. Details the life of Van Gogh and the paintings are superb. Good restaurant with lots of healthy choice. Shops on site selling lots of arty stuff. Lots of walking involved but good access for wheelchair users as well. Would recommend.
Jack Longfield (19 months ago)
Much better than I was expecting. The story of his life was interesting as well as moving and the art was excellent. I was happy to find a couple of Monet's within the collection I was not expecting to see. Bit pricey though (€19pp).
Bryony Pimble (19 months ago)
Sadly the sunflowers painting was undergoing conservation when I visited, however the rest of the works on show made up for it. I love the sketches and sketchbooks too. The letters would have been interesting if I could understand the language- but that's my own ignorant fault! Great museum. Really enjoyed it.
Big Ped (20 months ago)
An informative and interesting exhibition. I recommend including the audio description as this elucidates many interesting facts about the paintings and Van Gogh's State of mind during that period. There are hundreds of paintings to see arranged over 3 floors. There is a timeline and narrative connected to the paintings as you proceed upwards to the third and final floor. Clearly described and unpretentious. Well worth a visit.
Tzu-Ya Liao (2 years ago)
Of course, I pretty enjoyed when I attended the museum. As Vincent Van Gogh is my role model while I was in high school which is the time I kept painting. The collections are awesome and the routes, organization in the museum are great, which can let us understanding Van Gogh from the beginning of his painting career to the end. Also we can know about how he painted and who influenced him at different stages. The last things I really surprised was the event holding at the top floor, which asked you to draw the outline(try to copy how Vincent drew). Not everyone did it, but I think it was a great chance to know how great he was, how marvelous works he made.
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Following the Great Fire of 1917, it took decades to restore the church. Tombstones from the city"s Jewish cemetery - destroyed by the Greek and Nazi German authorities - were used as building materials in these restoration efforts in the 1940s. Archeological excavations conducted in the 1930s and 1940s revealed interesting artifacts that may be seen in a museum situated inside the church"s crypt. The excavations also uncovered the ruins of a Roman bath, where St. Demetrius was said to have been held prisoner and executed. A Roman well was also discovered. Scholars believe this is where soldiers dropped the body of St. Demetrius after his execution. After restoration, the church was reconsecrated in 1949.