The American Hotel, locally known as the Hotel Americain, was built in 1898-1900 by W. Kromhout and W. G. Jansen in the Berlage style. In 1927-1928 an expansion was realized from a design by the architect G.J. Rutgers in collaboration with K. Bakker in 1927-1928. Both the expansion and the café are National Heritage sites. The Amsterdam American Hotel is a member of Historic Hotels Worldwide.

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    Founded: 1898-1900
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    4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Alma Herrera (5 months ago)
    I am having a blast here, service is first class and staff is super nice. Breakfast during Covid pandemic does not include buffet, but they serve a big platter European style.
    Sotiria Tsakou (5 months ago)
    An extraordinary place! You can visit from morning till noon. We went for breakfast! Super delicious and the prices are ok. Kinds friendly ( they gave my 3.5 daughter to draw)
    Jacqueline Verhagen (6 months ago)
    Amazing hotel, great staff, beautiful rooms and awesome location!
    Tim S. (7 months ago)
    Great hotel, great service. Really cool rooms and well thought through concept. Quiet enough for a good night's sleep and great breakfast. Location is epic
    Michiel Simon (8 months ago)
    Great experience; very friendly staff and high quality rooms. We upgraded to a Deluxe room and the 4th floor view was just great. Room was facing south-west so we had full sun on our balcony until it set. Due to Covid, dinner was served in a separate hotel room which something else for a change. True private dining, music, TV and all courses properly served at our doorstep. Perfect alternative to a restaurant- don’t think we’ll ever have that experience again so great memory! Recommend this place for sure.
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    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

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    Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

    Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

    Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

    Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.