The American Hotel, locally known as the Hotel Americain, was built in 1898-1900 by W. Kromhout and W. G. Jansen in the Berlage style. In 1927-1928 an expansion was realized from a design by the architect G.J. Rutgers in collaboration with K. Bakker in 1927-1928. Both the expansion and the café are National Heritage sites. The Amsterdam American Hotel is a member of Historic Hotels Worldwide.

References:

    Comments

    Your name



    Details

    Founded: 1898-1900
    Category:

    Rating

    4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Jacqueline Verhagen (32 days ago)
    Amazing hotel, great staff, beautiful rooms and awesome location!
    Tim S. (2 months ago)
    Great hotel, great service. Really cool rooms and well thought through concept. Quiet enough for a good night's sleep and great breakfast. Location is epic
    Michiel Simon (3 months ago)
    Great experience; very friendly staff and high quality rooms. We upgraded to a Deluxe room and the 4th floor view was just great. Room was facing south-west so we had full sun on our balcony until it set. Due to Covid, dinner was served in a separate hotel room which something else for a change. True private dining, music, TV and all courses properly served at our doorstep. Perfect alternative to a restaurant- don’t think we’ll ever have that experience again so great memory! Recommend this place for sure.
    Musaddiq Surani (3 months ago)
    Nice hotel. Its just during pandemic everything seems gloomy. Anyway love the way its decorated
    Michael Friebe (6 months ago)
    Hard Rock Hotel Amsterdam: Super friendly and professional staff. Hotel is brand new (at the time of this review) and smells really nice. Good music too. But the staff truly is a amazing and helpful. Strongly recommend.
    Powered by Google

    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

    Historic Site of the week

    Abbey of Saint-Étienne

    The Abbey of Saint-Etienne, also known as Abbaye aux Hommes ('Men"s Abbey'), is a former monastery dedicated to Saint Stephen (Saint Étienne). It is considered, along with the neighbouring Abbaye aux Dames ('Ladies" Abbey'), to be one of the most notable Romanesque buildings in Normandy. Like all the major abbeys in Normandy, it was Benedictine.

    Lanfranc, before being an Archbishop of Canterbury, was abbot of Saint-Etienne. Built in Caen stone during the 11th century, the two semi-completed churches stood for many decades in competition. An important feature added to both churches in about 1120 was the ribbed vault, used for the first time in France. The two abbey churches are considered forerunners of the Gothic architecture. The original Romanesque apse was replaced in 1166 by an early Gothic chevet, complete with rosette windows and flying buttresses. Nine towers and spires were added in the 13th century. The interior vaulting shows a similar progression, beginning with early sexpartite vaulting (using circular ribs) in the nave and progressing to quadipartite vaults (using pointed ribs) in the sanctuary.

    The two monasteries were finally donated by William the Conqueror and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, as penalty for their marriage against the Pope"s ruling. William was buried here; Matilda was buried in the Abbaye aux Dames. Unfortunately William"s original tombstone of black marble, the same kind as Matilda"s in the Abbaye aux Dames, was destroyed by the Calvinist iconoclasts in the 16th century and his bones scattered.

    As a consequence of the Wars of Religion, the high lantern tower in the middle of the church collapsed and was never rebuilt. The Benedictine abbey was suppressed during the French Revolution and the abbey church became a parish church. From 1804 to 1961, the abbey buildings accommodated a prestigious high school, the Lycée Malherbe. During the Normandy Landings in 1944, inhabitants of Caen found refuge in the church; on the rooftop there was a red cross, made with blood on a sheet, to show that it was a hospital (to avoid bombings).