The American Hotel, locally known as the Hotel Americain, was built in 1898-1900 by W. Kromhout and W. G. Jansen in the Berlage style. In 1927-1928 an expansion was realized from a design by the architect G.J. Rutgers in collaboration with K. Bakker in 1927-1928. Both the expansion and the café are National Heritage sites. The Amsterdam American Hotel is a member of Historic Hotels Worldwide.

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    Founded: 1898-1900
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    4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Schatzie N (11 months ago)
    High end hotel, nice staff. Clean room. We stayed in the junior suite. Nice bathroom, comfortable bed. Quiet for a large hotel.
    Trygve Sørli (11 months ago)
    On a former trip to Amsterdam I want by this hotel and said to myself: Im gonna stay here one day. I did, and it lived up to the expectations. Clean large room with nice styling.
    Moke F (11 months ago)
    Amazing location..... Great and professional service from the lobby to room service to restaurant and bar. However, the fact that it's an old building it had some issues in the room i was in. A dripping sound from outside of my room keep me awake the whole night.
    Vinay Yadav (11 months ago)
    Hotel is located in a very calm and quiet neighborhood with the exceptional views from hotel. The food and ambience is good with a hotel having its own bar. Also the room are good with brilliant housekeeping. You will definitely gonna love your stay in here. Approximately 1KM away from all the tourist destinations. With a lover canal boat service right opposite to hotel
    elvinn coles (12 months ago)
    What a Hotel !! Pure Pleasure. In Love. In the Heart and Centre of Amsterdam. Lovely staff, great prices. Faultless
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