Rheinfels Castle Ruins

Sankt Goar, Germany

Rheinfels Castle construction was started in 1245 by Count Diether V of Katzenelnbogen. After expansions, it was the largest fortress in the Middle Rhein Valley between Koblenz and Mainz. It was slighted by French Revolutionary Army troops in 1797.

The main entrance to the castle complex is a tall square clock or gate tower (~1300 AD) opposite the hotel. A connecting path joins the clock tower to the remains of the living quarters of the Earls of Hessen-Darmstadt (the so-called Darmstadt Building). The Darmstadt building was designed in Tudor style with pointed gables. The connecting path was the site of the former moat of the main castle buildings; part of which is now the large cellar or basement. This large cellar was arched over in 1587-89 in two visible phases. It is the largest self-supporting vaulted cellar in Europe and has a length of 24 metres, a width and height of approximately 16 metres and can accommodate up to 400 people.

The walls are up to 4 metres thick. Previously a 200,000 litres wine barrel was constructed for storage. The cellar was renovated in 1997 and restored to its original condition and now serves as a meeting place for concerts, theater performances, and other shows.

The castle museum is located in the former castle chapel which is the only finished room of the original castle. It is accessed through an internal gate and up the path. The museum contains a model reconstruction of the castle before its destruction giving one a sense of how big the castle used to be. The medieval castle courtyard is found beyond the castle museum building (slightly uphill). This was the center of the medieval castle which contained a bakery, pharmacy, garden, brewery, well, and livestock—which would have allowed it to withstand an extended siege. Remnants of the original 13th-century plaster which was painted white can still be found on some walls.

While much of the castle is a ruin, some of the outer buildings are now a hotel and restaurant.

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Details

Founded: 1245
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

maritina diamantopoulou (2 years ago)
Nice location, big rooms. BUT, not clean enough. Flies and bees over food that was not covered, spider webs on all the windows all around the restaurant and on the ceiling, and witnessed clean towels on the stairs while cleaning of the rooms was in process.
jun kang (2 years ago)
Die Managerin dieses Resta urants ist rassistisch. This restaurant manag eress is racist to be. La femme respons able de ce restaurant est raciste. La donna manager di que sto ristorante è razzista. Kierownik tej restau racji jest rasistą. Женщина-менеджер этого рес торана расист. La mujer gere nte de este restaurante es racista. ‎مدير المرأة في هذا الم. طعم عنصري. Kvinnans ch ef för denna restaurang är rasistisk. このレストラン. の女性支配人は、人種差別をする。 這家餐廳. 的女經理是種族主義者。 这家餐厅的女经理. 是种族主义者。 이 레스토랑 여지배인은 인종차별주의자다 ㅆ ㅂ ㄴ ㅎ ㅣ틀러 같은 년
Joyce Hartzell (2 years ago)
The rooms were just ok. Service in the restaurant was incredibly slow. There was an exquisite view, the only really good thing. No air conditioning.
Brett Gottfried (2 years ago)
At at the restaurant that is out on the balcony. The food was pretty decent and the prices were not that bad. You also get a great view of the Rhine River while you eat. Even if you are not staying at the restaurant this place is great to come and have a coffee.
あい (2 years ago)
Hotel located in Rheinfels castle. The restaurant will guide foreigners voluntarily to the wall side. People who are concerned need attention. From the room you can hope for the River Rhine. Customer service is neither good nor bad. I felt that other guests were more kind than the hotel staff.
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