Liebfrauenkirche

Koblenz, Germany

The Liebfrauenkirche (Church of Our Beloved Lady) has always been the parish church of Koblenz. It dates back to the 5th century when the Franks erected a place of prayer within the Roman walls. The church has been converted and extended several times using the original foundations. The gothic chancel was built around 1404 but the Baroque dome towers date from 1693. The twin-tower façade in the west corresponds to the effect of the west façades of the former monastery churches of St. Castor and St. Florin in Koblenz.

Liebfrauenkirche has 4 bells in the bell tower. In commemoration of the closing of the town gates and the related curfew, the ringing of the Barbara bell, the so-called 'reveller bell', has been kept going over the years. The 'reveller bell“ still rings at 22.00 every evening. The chimes and the hourly bells then remain silent until the early morning.

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Details

Founded: 1180 / 1404
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.koblenz-touristik.de

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

larry lee (7 months ago)
Great location
Niranjan Gummanur (8 months ago)
Must visit ! Such a great place , peaceful , beautifully built and heartfully taken care of ! You get transported into deeper realms as soon as you enter this place. Highly recommend this place.
JKB Buehringen (11 months ago)
My favorite church in Koblenz.
ANDER FUENTES-ARRIZABALAGA (3 years ago)
Lovely stained glasses
Jacco Amersfoort (3 years ago)
Fine church but not the greatest. I dislike the flashy colors. Very nice leadlights in the windows
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