Liebfrauenkirche

Koblenz, Germany

The Liebfrauenkirche (Church of Our Beloved Lady) has always been the parish church of Koblenz. It dates back to the 5th century when the Franks erected a place of prayer within the Roman walls. The church has been converted and extended several times using the original foundations. The gothic chancel was built around 1404 but the Baroque dome towers date from 1693. The twin-tower façade in the west corresponds to the effect of the west façades of the former monastery churches of St. Castor and St. Florin in Koblenz.

Liebfrauenkirche has 4 bells in the bell tower. In commemoration of the closing of the town gates and the related curfew, the ringing of the Barbara bell, the so-called 'reveller bell', has been kept going over the years. The 'reveller bell“ still rings at 22.00 every evening. The chimes and the hourly bells then remain silent until the early morning.

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Details

Founded: 1180 / 1404
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.koblenz-touristik.de

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alby Augustine (5 months ago)
It was a typical german church with a nice ambience. The good thing is we didn't had to get an appointment in advance.
Bin Sanad (BinSanad) (11 months ago)
Nice religious place & culture
ncku16howard (13 months ago)
A church is in center of downtown and surround by ice cream stores. Hard to miss it when you are hanging round.
Uzair Khaskheli (2 years ago)
The symbolic church of koblenz.
Anthony Munns (3 years ago)
Pretty, historic church that has woven the Star of David into its stained glass windows as a tribute to the Jews of Koblenz treatment in Ww2. Look upper right side of the altar. Currently undergoing some interior renovations which was loud and restrictive but worth seeing. Historic Hewish gravestones were used bbn in construction in earlier history.
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