Deutschherrenhaus

Koblenz, Germany

The Deutschherrenhaus or Deutschordenshaus in Koblenz was the first settlement of the Teutonic Order Knights in Rhineland. The divine order of knights played a substantial role in the East German colonisation. Since 1929 it has been a clerical order and is, after the Maltese Order and the templars, the third largest order of knights which was formed at the time of the crusades. The chosen motto of the order is “help, defend and heal“.

The Archbishop Theoderich von Wied summoned the Knights of the Teutonic Order to Koblenz in 1216 and presented them from the St. Castor’s Foundation a piece of land together with the St. Nikolaus hospital that was located directly at the point where the Moselle flows into the Rhine.

Due to the destruction in 1944, Deutschherrenhaus, the former administrative building of the Teutonic Order is the only building among the many that has remained till nowadays. Since 1992 it has been the house for the Ludwig Museum, devoted primarily to the French art.

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Category: Museums in Germany

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jamie Smith (11 months ago)
I love chilling there.
Werner Krings (2 years ago)
Tolles Ambiente, kompetente Führung.
Frank Rockenfeller (2 years ago)
Interessante Ausstellungen, und das in einem sehr schönen Gebäude in Koblenz.
Doyk Hwang (2 years ago)
숨은 보석같은 미술관입니다. 작은 건물이지만 흥미로운 현대 미술 작품들을 다수 전시하고 있습니다. 코블렌츠에 들리셨다면 한번쯤 방문해 볼 만한 가치가 충분한 장소입니다.
Mya Cyr (2 years ago)
Beautiful, albeit quick museum. Was afraid when we showed up an hour before closing that we wouldn't have enough time, but it was plenty enjoyable during that time.
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