Deutschherrenhaus

Koblenz, Germany

The Deutschherrenhaus or Deutschordenshaus in Koblenz was the first settlement of the Teutonic Order Knights in Rhineland. The divine order of knights played a substantial role in the East German colonisation. Since 1929 it has been a clerical order and is, after the Maltese Order and the templars, the third largest order of knights which was formed at the time of the crusades. The chosen motto of the order is “help, defend and heal“.

The Archbishop Theoderich von Wied summoned the Knights of the Teutonic Order to Koblenz in 1216 and presented them from the St. Castor’s Foundation a piece of land together with the St. Nikolaus hospital that was located directly at the point where the Moselle flows into the Rhine.

Due to the destruction in 1944, Deutschherrenhaus, the former administrative building of the Teutonic Order is the only building among the many that has remained till nowadays. Since 1992 it has been the house for the Ludwig Museum, devoted primarily to the French art.

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Category: Museums in Germany

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Smith (2 years ago)
What can one say? It’s a big thumb!
Shuiruo Hu (3 years ago)
Almost nothing to visit. Few interesting pieces, still the staff is not familiar to the collection... sitting or chatting. We cannot understand how this place could charge 7eur/p
Susan Wilmot (3 years ago)
Underwhelming, in fact disappointing. The grand exterior is the most impressive aspect. The collection is patchy and felt like a foundation show.
Juan Manuel Gabarron (3 years ago)
traditionL German architecture, great outdoors, bold Bernard Venet Sculpture at the entrance
Jamie Smith (3 years ago)
I love chilling there.
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