Porvoo Hill Fort

Porvoo, Finland

There are two ancient hill forts in Porvoo, so-called small and big one. There is burial ground in a small hill from the Roman Iron Age (0-400 AD). The items found in excavations reveal that Porvoo river has been a remarkable trading centre already in prehistoric times and local people has had connections to Estonia and Latvia.

The bigger hill fort is one of the largest in Finland. It was used for defensive purposes already in the Viking Age (800-900 AD), but the fortifications date from the late 14th century. Today remains of double walls and dry moat are visible and restored.

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Address

Pappilankuja 2, Porvoo, Finland
See all sites in Porvoo

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lior Sion (10 months ago)
Super cool but small hill with some trails cross crossing it. Fun 20min session
Esa Hynynen (11 months ago)
Love the moats, exactly like it was in the 1200s!
Katarina Jurišić (2 years ago)
Amazing and fun! There are smaller and bigger hills suitable fir everyone from 2 years old to grown ups ?
Elena S (3 years ago)
Really nice place for a walk. There are some cute bridges and mostly trees. You have a beautiful view on the river. Other than that there’s not much more to see. So if you live nearby it’s worth a visit but other than that it’s not really exciting.
Marieke Kramer (3 years ago)
Beautiful surroundings near the old town of Porvoo
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