Porvoo Cathedral

Porvoo, Finland

The Porvoo Cathedral was originally made of wood. The first stone walls were built between 1410 and 1420 and in 1450 the church was expanded four meters towards east and six meters towards south.

The cathedral has been destroyed by fire numerous times; in 1508 by Danish and in 1571, 1590, and 1708 by Russian forces. On May 29, 2006, the outer roof collapsed after arson, however with the inner ceiling undamaged and the cathedral interiors intact. The Cathedral was reopened on 2 July 2008.

Porvoo Cathedral is situated in the middle of Porvoo well-preserved and beautiful old town, which is popular tourist attraction particurarly in summer season.

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Details

Founded: 1410-1420
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Markkanen Lp (12 months ago)
Architectonic jewel.
Otso Hyvärinen (12 months ago)
One of the only churches in finland which has 3 stories in it. Very peaceful and harmonic feel to it.
K Kuismanen (12 months ago)
Looks good.
Tinna am More than Blessed Kristine (12 months ago)
This cathedral is an ancient one, and looks like was made just yesterday! From outside looks a little boring, but inside its fabulous, classical artistic ancient finishing and looks so awesome, it's just amazing, it's a shame that it's not well utilized by the locals. Then there is this very short door that's one of its kind on an adjustant building, I loved it's serenity, nice and cool place to connect with the inner yourself.
Lisa T (17 months ago)
Charming Village - delightful cafes & shops but none of the historic buildings, museums or churches are open. The online sites show they are all open but, all were closed/locked....Disappointing if you want more than shopping. Must be wonderful in the summer.
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