Söderkulla Manor

Sipoo, Finland

Söderkulla manor, a historically and architecturally notable estate, is situated in the scenic Sipoonjoki river valley between Helsinki and Porvoo. The royal estate was established in 1557 by Gustav Vasa, the King of Sweden, but Söderkulla was already mentioned in 1494. The manor was owned by Ekelöf family from 1563 to 1700, when it was acquired by Lorentz Creutz.

The main building was completed in 1908 and its architecture is typical of the Art Nouveau movement. The main building was originally meant for residential use and has served during its history as a nursing home as well as a school for forest guards and a school of agriculture. There is also a neo-Gothic magazine from the 19th century.

Today Söderkulla hosts events and conferences.

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Details

Founded: 1908
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.soderkulla.fi

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