Roman Theater

Mainz, Germany

Mainz, known as Mogontiacum, was Rome’s most important city in Germania. In fact, the stage and auditorium of the Mainz theater was the largest anywhere north of the Alps. More than 10,000 audience members could be accommodated. The theater proportions were gigantic: The stage measured 42 meters wide. The audience area was 116 meters in width. The Roman Theater is located just above the Mainz-South Station adjacent the the “Roemisches Theater”-Station.

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Address

Zitadellenweg, Mainz, Germany
See all sites in Mainz

Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

More Information

www.livius.org
www.mainz.de

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jeff Hamme (5 months ago)
Cool seeing a Roman theater. Was still being worked.
Jimmie E Hall (5 months ago)
Lots of new movies, great parking, clean inside, great customer service. Great atmosphere.
Marcela Bucsa-Rati (8 months ago)
So easy to miss and it's been there for 1000 of years
Derrick Dillon (2 years ago)
Best Roman theater I have ever seen at a train station! 10/10 would wait for a train here again!
Carbo Kuo (3 years ago)
Nothing to see. Closed.
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