Niederwalddenkmal monument was constructed to commemorate the foundation of the German Empire after the end of Franco-Prussian War. The first stone was laid on September 16, 1871, by Wilhelm I. The sculptor was Johannes Schilling, and the architect was Karl Weisbach. The total cost of the work is estimated at one million gold marks. It was inaugurated on September 28, 1883. The 38 metres tall monument represents the union of all Germans.

The central figure is the 10.5 metres tall Germania figure. In the sculptured impression, Germania holds the recovered crown of the emperor in the right hand and in the left the Imperial Sword. Beneath Germania is a large relief that shows emperor Wilhelm I riding a horse with nobility, the army commanders and soldiers. The relief has the Wacht am Rhein (Watch on the Rhine) lyrics engraved. On the left side of the monument is located the peace statue. The war statue is located on the right.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1871
Category: Statues in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tricia Leo (14 months ago)
I went in Feb. It was very quiet with barely 10 other people there. But I loved it. No crowds. You have the whole place to yourself. I could hear the sounds from the city below and birds chirping. The view of the Rhine is amazing. The monument in incredibly detailed. It's amazing how they built that in 1870!
Ana Aguilar (2 years ago)
Wonderfully impressive.... Not quite as large as the statue of liberty but it reminded me of it. And the cable car on the way up there is a lovely adventure. Great sites of the river and surrounding towns.
Fiona Buckley (2 years ago)
Lovely cable car ride to the monument through the vines. Monument is huge!!! Its beautiful. As we visited in winter time the view was a little misty but non the less beautiful!
Lars Stanley (2 years ago)
This is a very nice statue to stop and see on the Rhein River. It was meant to symbolize peace between France and Germany. Very nice views to see from it as well. I always compared it to the statue of liberty, but it's not quite as big. Just as exciting to see!
Alexander Klein (2 years ago)
30min walk through lovely vineyards from carpark P2 in Rüdesheim up to the monument. Once you reached the top enjoy the stunning views. I'd say much better than the Lorelei. Great documentation of the monument and it's history. Give it an hour and before you leave have drink and enjoy the view one last time. If you fancy take the cable car back. Just €3 one-way for an adult and a great experience.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kromeriz Castle and Gardens

Kroměříž stands on the site of an earlier ford across the River Morava. The gardens and castle of Kroměříž are an exceptionally complete and well-preserved example of a European Baroque princely residence and its gardens and described as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The first residence on the site was founded by bishop Stanislas Thurzo in 1497. The building was in a Late Gothic style, with a modicum of Renaissance detail. During the Thirty Years' War, the castle was sacked by the Swedish army (1643).

It was not until 1664 that a bishop from the powerful Liechtenstein family charged architect Filiberto Lucchese with renovating the palace in a Baroque style. The chief monument of Lucchese's work in Kroměříž is the Pleasure Garden in front of the castle. Upon Lucchese's death in 1666, Giovanni Pietro Tencalla completed his work on the formal garden and had the palace rebuilt in a style reminiscent of the Turinese school to which he belonged.

After the castle was gutted by a major fire in March 1752, Bishop Hamilton commissioned two leading imperial artists, Franz Anton Maulbertsch and Josef Stern, arrived at the residence in order to decorate the halls of the palace with their works. In addition to their paintings, the palace still houses an art collection, generally considered the second finest in the country, which includes Titian's last mythological painting, The Flaying of Marsyas. The largest part of the collection was acquired by Bishop Karel in Cologne in 1673. The palace also contains an outstanding musical archive and a library of 33,000 volumes.

UNESCO lists the palace and garden among the World Heritage Sites. As the nomination dossier explains, 'the castle is a good but not outstanding example of a type of aristocratic or princely residence that has survived widely in Europe. The Pleasure Garden, by contrast, is a very rare and largely intact example of a Baroque garden'. Apart from the formal parterres there is also a less formal nineteenth-century English garden, which sustained damage during floods in 1997.

Interiors of the palace were extensively used by Miloš Forman as a stand-in for Vienna's Hofburg Imperial Palace during filming of Amadeus (1984), based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who actually never visited Kroměříž. The main audience chamber was also used in the film Immortal Beloved (1994), in the piano concerto scene.