Niederwalddenkmal monument was constructed to commemorate the foundation of the German Empire after the end of Franco-Prussian War. The first stone was laid on September 16, 1871, by Wilhelm I. The sculptor was Johannes Schilling, and the architect was Karl Weisbach. The total cost of the work is estimated at one million gold marks. It was inaugurated on September 28, 1883. The 38 metres tall monument represents the union of all Germans.

The central figure is the 10.5 metres tall Germania figure. In the sculptured impression, Germania holds the recovered crown of the emperor in the right hand and in the left the Imperial Sword. Beneath Germania is a large relief that shows emperor Wilhelm I riding a horse with nobility, the army commanders and soldiers. The relief has the Wacht am Rhein (Watch on the Rhine) lyrics engraved. On the left side of the monument is located the peace statue. The war statue is located on the right.

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Details

Founded: 1871
Category: Statues in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tricia Leo (6 months ago)
I went in Feb. It was very quiet with barely 10 other people there. But I loved it. No crowds. You have the whole place to yourself. I could hear the sounds from the city below and birds chirping. The view of the Rhine is amazing. The monument in incredibly detailed. It's amazing how they built that in 1870!
Ana Aguilar (8 months ago)
Wonderfully impressive.... Not quite as large as the statue of liberty but it reminded me of it. And the cable car on the way up there is a lovely adventure. Great sites of the river and surrounding towns.
Fiona Buckley (8 months ago)
Lovely cable car ride to the monument through the vines. Monument is huge!!! Its beautiful. As we visited in winter time the view was a little misty but non the less beautiful!
Lars Stanley (9 months ago)
This is a very nice statue to stop and see on the Rhein River. It was meant to symbolize peace between France and Germany. Very nice views to see from it as well. I always compared it to the statue of liberty, but it's not quite as big. Just as exciting to see!
Alexander Klein (10 months ago)
30min walk through lovely vineyards from carpark P2 in Rüdesheim up to the monument. Once you reached the top enjoy the stunning views. I'd say much better than the Lorelei. Great documentation of the monument and it's history. Give it an hour and before you leave have drink and enjoy the view one last time. If you fancy take the cable car back. Just €3 one-way for an adult and a great experience.
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