Teylingen Castle Ruins

Sassenheim, Netherlands

Slot Teylingen was presumably the family keep of the noble family Van Teylingen, from which the Van Brederode family directly descended. The castle was originally built to protect the north-south route in Hollandic territory. Later it became a forester's castle for the forestry of the counts of Holland, starting with William IV, count of Holland.

One of the best known inhabitants of the castle was Jacoba of Bavaria, who died there and her 4th husband Frank van Borssele. The drinking cups that have been dug up in the surrounding area are called Jacobakanntjes.

In present day only ruins are left of the castle. These ruins are, however, well preserved, existing out of a surrounding wall and a donjon which forms part of the wall, and which is partially surrounded by water. The wall dates from the start of the 13th century and the main building shortly thereafter. The castle was heavily damaged around 1570 in the Eighty Years' War, and partially restored after that.

Around 1675 the donjon was burned in a fire, after which decay set it, and parts were gradually demolished. The lands (and the ruins) were possessions of the province of Holland, and were nationalised in 1795. Shortly after the complex was sold, under the condition that the ruins would not be demolished.

In 1889 the ruins were donated by Jhr. Mr. W. van Teylingen back to the Dutch state, who still owns them. The ruins are under the care of the Rijksgebouwendienst (State's building service). At the end of the 20th century, the ruins were restored and the moat, which had been partially filled, was restored as well.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

HH de Vries (21 months ago)
Entrance from march till oktober
Carlos Villalobos (2 years ago)
Small ruin with a small fee. Great resting spot. Not far from the local town.
Ernest Terlouw (3 years ago)
Wake up! This is my domicile. Do not include in your rating.
Pafciokss (3 years ago)
The worst place ever...
toyyou2jp toyyou2jp (3 years ago)
Teylingen is a small castle next to village Sassenheim. I watched yearly flower parade passing through Sassenheim so that I went to visit this collapsed castle, too. It is tiny with a few items to display. A guy posed as ancient knight. It will take 30 min. to complete the tour.
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