Beaufort Castle

Beaufort, Luxembourg

Beaufort Castle consists of the ruins of the medieval fortress and an adjacent Renaissance château. It probably originates from the 11th century when a small square-shaped fortress was built on a large rock protected by a moat and a second wall above the valley. A reference from 1192 indicates that Wauthtier de Wiltz et Beaufort was its first lord. During the first half of the 12th century, a keep was added and the gate was moved and enlarged. In 1348, the property came into the hands of the House of Orley after Adelaide of Beaufort married William of Orley. The Lords of Orley made significant extensions overlooking the valley. In 1477, Maximilian of Austria transferred the castle to Johann Bayer von Boppard after Johann von Orley-Beaufort committed a breach in trust. In 1539, Bernard von Velbrück became Lord of Beaufort through marriage and added the large Renaissance wing with cross-framed windows on top of the medieval walls.

The castle then came into the hands of Gaspard de Heu who had married Velbrück's granddaughter. A partisan of the Dutch resistance and the House of Orange, de Heu was captured by the Spaniards, accused of heresy and treason, and publicly executed in Luxembourg's fish market in 1593. Philip II of Spain confiscated the property and entrusted it to Peter Ernst Graf von Mansfeld, the governor of Luxembourg. Through marriage, the castle became the property of Henri de Chalon and then Gaspard du Bost-Moulin who had to sell it after being ruined by the Thirty Years War. Acting on behalf of the Spanish king, Johann Baron von Beck, governor of Luxembourg, bought most of the property in 1639. He initiated the construction of the Renaissance castle in 1643 but after he died of injuries from the Battle of Lens in 1648, the work was completed by his son in 1649.

After various changes in ownership including Pierre de Coumont (1774) and Jean Théodore Baron de Tornaco-Vervoy (1781), the castle was abandoned, fell into disrepair and at the beginning of the 19th century was even used as a quarry. In 1850, it was listed by the State as a national monument. In 1893, the new owner Henri Even restored the new building and, in 1928, Edmond Linkels cleared the rubble away and opened the medieval castle to visitors. In 1981, the property was acquired by the State.

The ruins of the medieval castle are open to visitors in summer season.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ashok Vasudevan (2 years ago)
Beautiful view while driving towards and back from the castle. The castle ruins itself is also very nice. Picturesque view from different corner of the castle. Shouldn't miss it. Mark it as a must watch.
Arjan van de Rest (2 years ago)
The place consists of 2 castles. A medieval one and a 17th century one. Both can be visited, albeit the second one with a guide. However, the guided visit is well worth it and took longer than the projected hour. And with the tour, you get a free taster of the raspberry liquor they make in house... Definitely worth 5 stars
Erik Jenchenne (3 years ago)
Went there for a special event, a play, on a Saturday evening. Very impressive spot in middle east Luxembourg. Staff was very welcoming. Only con is that it is a hell of a road to get there, lots of small roads.
Not Given (3 years ago)
Very cool to see. Very surprising to find it in the area it is. Didn't go in, but even as a quick stop for a photo, it's nice. Parking was really easy (and free apparently) but a bit of a walk if you want to go in.
Max Post (3 years ago)
The castle was closed for maintenance but it looked beautiful from the outside. We went on a beatiful hike however. The are is best for intermediate walks of about 10km.
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