Beaufort Castle consists of the ruins of the medieval fortress and an adjacent Renaissance château. It probably originates from the 11th century when a small square-shaped fortress was built on a large rock protected by a moat and a second wall above the valley. A reference from 1192 indicates that Wauthtier de Wiltz et Beaufort was its first lord. During the first half of the 12th century, a keep was added and the gate was moved and enlarged. In 1348, the property came into the hands of the House of Orley after Adelaide of Beaufort married William of Orley. The Lords of Orley made significant extensions overlooking the valley. In 1477, Maximilian of Austria transferred the castle to Johann Bayer von Boppard after Johann von Orley-Beaufort committed a breach in trust. In 1539, Bernard von Velbrück became Lord of Beaufort through marriage and added the large Renaissance wing with cross-framed windows on top of the medieval walls.

The castle then came into the hands of Gaspard de Heu who had married Velbrück's granddaughter. A partisan of the Dutch resistance and the House of Orange, de Heu was captured by the Spaniards, accused of heresy and treason, and publicly executed in Luxembourg's fish market in 1593. Philip II of Spain confiscated the property and entrusted it to Peter Ernst Graf von Mansfeld, the governor of Luxembourg. Through marriage, the castle became the property of Henri de Chalon and then Gaspard du Bost-Moulin who had to sell it after being ruined by the Thirty Years War. Acting on behalf of the Spanish king, Johann Baron von Beck, governor of Luxembourg, bought most of the property in 1639. He initiated the construction of the Renaissance castle in 1643 but after he died of injuries from the Battle of Lens in 1648, the work was completed by his son in 1649.

After various changes in ownership including Pierre de Coumont (1774) and Jean Théodore Baron de Tornaco-Vervoy (1781), the castle was abandoned, fell into disrepair and at the beginning of the 19th century was even used as a quarry. In 1850, it was listed by the State as a national monument. In 1893, the new owner Henri Even restored the new building and, in 1928, Edmond Linkels cleared the rubble away and opened the medieval castle to visitors. In 1981, the property was acquired by the State.

The ruins of the medieval castle are open to visitors in summer season.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Luxembourg

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yannis Akridiotis (2 years ago)
Nice restoration, gives a good idea of the castles of that period in Europe. The wooded surroundings offer a nice resting place between hikes. A small cafe at the castle is also good, although a bit expensive for what it offers. Try the locally produced casis on ice in a hot summer's day!
Tami Pacumio (2 years ago)
We visited a lot of castles while we were in Europe but Beaufort is by far my favorite. It would be fantastic if they could come up with the funds for a little more restoration but it is impressive none the less. If I had all those stairs to do everyday I would weigh a lot less. Being able to tour at your leisure with the placards to tell you what the room you are in was used for just lets your imagination run wild! We fell in love with their Black Currant Liqueur and brought more than a case home with us. Good thing too, they don't export any of it. If you love it find a way to take it home or you lose!
Bo Krause (2 years ago)
Great castles. Medieval castle is beautiful simple. For visiting the other castle you have to take a guide. Inside that castle the furniture is still as it used to be and it feels like someone is still living there. Great atmosphere, great guide.
Frank Wils (2 years ago)
2 castles at 1 site. A medieval castle in ruins and behind it a Renaissance castle left behind exactly as it was when the last owner died. Do take a ticket for both and take the tour through the newer castle. The old ruins are impressive and very photogenic, but the newer castle has a real charm to it. Lovely rooms really take you back in time. One of the best tours we ever had. At the end taste the local cherry liquor and buy if you like it. Easily take 2/2,5 hours to explore this site.
Jeff Placer (2 years ago)
An absolutely magnificent Castle. So many aspects of it are so well preserved that it's possible to almost imagine what it must have been like to live there. The illustrations on the walls really put things in perspective and bring everything to life. It was well worth our side trip to Luxembourg to see This Magnificent Castle.
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