Liebfrauenkirche

Trier, Germany

The Liebfrauenkirche (German for Church of Our Lady) is, along with the Cathedral of Magdeburg the earliest Gothic church in Germany and falls into the architectural tradition of the French Gothic cathedrals. It is designated as part of the Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier UNESCO World Heritage Site.

A Roman double church originally stood here. The southern portion was torn down around 1200 and completely replaced by the Early Gothic Church of Our Lady (Liebfrauen). The exact date of the start of construction can no longer be determined, however a painted inscription inside on a column in the church reads: 'The construction of this church was started in 1227 and ended in 1243'. However, it is currently thought construction began in 1230 by Archbishop of Trier Theodoric II.

Around 1260, the building was probably finished. In 1492, a high peak was placed on the central tower, which was named because of its high technology and degree of craftsmanship perfection. The high peak can be seen on the city dating, but was destroyed in a storm on Heimsuchungstag (July 2) in 1631. Subsequently a hipped roof emplaced, which was destroyed in the Second World War. It was first replaced in 1945 by a roof and then by a steeper one in 2003.

A special feature of the basilica is its atypical cruciform floor plan as a round church, whose cross-shaped vaulting with four corresponding portals in rounded niches is completed by eight rounded altar niches so that the floor plan resembles a twelve-petaled rose, a symbol of the Virgin Mary, the rosa mystica, and reminiscent of the twelve tribes of Israel and the Twelve Apostles. The apostles as well as the twelve articles of the Apostle's Creed are painted on the twelve supporting columns, completely visible only from one spot marked by a black stone.

Though nothing above the surface is Roman any longer, but there are extensive excavations (not open to the public) underneath the church and several of the Gothic pillars stand on top of Roman column foundations.

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Details

Founded: c. 1230
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Connie Zimmer-Meyer (21 months ago)
Beautiful gothic church
Spencer Hawken (21 months ago)
Possibly the most impressive church I have visited in my life. I laugh now as I thought this was a cathedral, but is actually the church. We spent a good hour visiting this extraordinary church and all its many layers, trust me I’m normally the first to be out of a church, but this truly felt like a place that could make you believe in something if like me you are an atheist. I’d loved to have seen a service, I can imagine this place is just so popular. It’s clearly well loved and maintained. There is an interesting heating system, and random construction filled with human remains. If you visit trier you simply have to visit this magnificent building.
Fernando Gomes (2 years ago)
Very beautifull church, with a very interesting story and a lot of diferent architectures stiles captured along the years it has. Loved the visit.
Yorkie pups 2016 (2 years ago)
Spectacular, especially the stained glass windows !
Frank Wils (2 years ago)
Early Gothic church next too, and by many confused for, the Trierer Dom. Shaped as a rose this is a very spacious big church. Most of the detail is in the architectural decorations. Unique ensemble together with later Dom.
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