Trier Cathedral

Trier, Germany

The Cathedral of Saint Peter in Trier is the oldest cathedral in Germany. The edifice is notable for its extremely long life span under multiple different eras each contributing some elements to its design, including the center of the main chapel being made of Roman brick laid under the direction of Saint Helen, resulting in a cathedral added onto gradually rather than rebuilt in different eras. Its dimensions, 112.5 by 41 m, make it the largest church structure in Trier. In 1986 it was listed as part of the Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The structure is raised upon the foundations of Roman buildings of Augusta Treverorum. Following the conversion of the Emperor Constantine the Bishop Maximin of Trier (329-346) coordinated the construction of the grandest ensemble of ecclesiastical structures in the West outside Rome: on a groundplan four times the area of the present cathedral no less than four basilicas, a baptistery and outbuildings were constructed; the four piers of the crossing formed the nucleus of the present structure.

The fourth-century structure was left in ruins by the Franks and rebuilt. Normans destroyed the structure again in 882. Under Archbishop Egbert (d. 993) it was restored once more.

The West front in five symmetrical sections remains typical of Romanesque architecture under the Salian emperors. The West end choir, with its apsidal semi-cylinder expressed on the exterior façade, was completed in 1196. The interior is of three Romanesque naves with Gothic vaulting, and a Baroque chapel for the relic of the Seamless robe of Jesus, recovered from the interior of the high altar in 1512, complete the interior.

The skull of St. Helena, the mother of Emperor Constantine, is displayed in the cathedral.

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Address

Windstraße 6-8, Trier, Germany
See all sites in Trier

Details

Founded: 4th century / 1235
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tim Lawrence (2 years ago)
Beautiful structure and history in this Cathedral. Walking around really gives a sense of how impressive the church was and is. Excellent spot for tourism, free entry, and a completely enjoyable experience if you like history and architecture. Excellent stop, very glad I got to experience it!
Katerina Kryst (2 years ago)
Beautiful church with unique architecture. Another plus on a cold day is that it has forced air central heating so it makes it very welcoming to stop and eat a while.
SilverSearcher (2 years ago)
This place is beautiful, great place for family photos or artsy Instagram photos lol. I went here with my family on a guided tour, but I think it would be more fun or as fun to go by yourself or with your friends. Plenty to see in the city and make sure to try the local beer! I would highly recommend that if you’re within a days drive of this place you should come and check it out. And there’s plenty else to do to fill your day once you go to this wall of artwork. Make sure to bring a good camera and check the weather before you come so you can get the best pictures possible. Also in town are some very beautiful steeples that are within walking distance, either taxi or walk through the city to get the best views, and don’t skip up any opportunities to check out local breweries or pubs, as those are some of the coolest places. Good luck and have fun in this city!
Rashmi Kathuria (3 years ago)
Every time I visit this cathedral it takes my breath away. It's extremely beautiful and the architecture is one of the best. Trier has always been a nice cosy city and this cathedral is a charm. Absolutely must on your travel list especially during Christmas markets - and that too on a Sunday when there's a special Sunday mass and musical chorus.
Michaela Novakova (3 years ago)
I like this church a lot. Its great that most places and underground place is all open to all. U can sit at many different altars. Its beautiful and great atmosphere :) and its free entry as church should be. And u can donate of course :)
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Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.