St. Gangolf's Church

Trier, Germany

The original St. Gangolf's Church was built in 958 AD, but replaced with a current one between 1284-1344. The Gothic parts were added around 1500 and Baroque elements between 1731-1746.

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Address

Grabenstraße 19, Trier, Germany
See all sites in Trier

Details

Founded: 1284-1344
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anja Fuchs (12 months ago)
Bezaubernder Ort der Ruhe, direkt am Markt
Martin Ring (13 months ago)
Schönste Kirche in Trier. Ort der Besinnung und der Stille
Julia Koster (2 years ago)
Schöner Ort zum Beten. Liegt etwas versteckt in der Innenstadt. Bei meinen Besuchen in Trier gehe ich immer hinein.
Frank Wils (2 years ago)
The most remarkable about the 'market-church' of Trier is that it's completely build in and the only way to reach it is through a small portal between houses on the market. Inside is nice, but nothing to outstanding.
Kah Soon Ang (3 years ago)
I was particularly drawn to the church's Gothic features and color scheme rivaling that of an apricot. As if to beckon me welcome, a magnolia was blossoming in the chilly spring weather, its petals scattering across the wind with each breeze. it was truly magical. I appreciated visiting the Church of St Gangolf was its relatively lack of visitors. It was not a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and with it partially blocked by surrounding buildings despite its tower sticking out, made it not very obvious as a visitor's spot. I was fortunate that I was lured in by the baroque portal that led me to it, otherwise I would be as ignorant as the next traveler. Definitely a place which I recommend highly to those who prefer something slightly off the beaten path.
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