St. Gangolf's Church

Trier, Germany

The original St. Gangolf's Church was built in 958 AD, but replaced with a current one between 1284-1344. The Gothic parts were added around 1500 and Baroque elements between 1731-1746.

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Address

Grabenstraße 19, Trier, Germany
See all sites in Trier

Details

Founded: 1284-1344
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Josip Rosandić (20 months ago)
Maybe I have been overwhelmed after visiting the famous cathedral, so my 4 stars may seem bit harsh, but I still think this one is definitely worth visiting. After all, it is located in city center. Germany does love her churches and this one is no exception, and it is well maintained so give her a go and take a few shots with your camera.
Aled's project (2 years ago)
The building ist just so cold in the winter.
JelleSchelfthout (2 years ago)
Beautifull Building. The garden is quiet and cosy. A perfect place to photograph.
Michael Tochi (2 years ago)
Its a very holy place but Mass is always conducted in German language. I wish they could use English sometimes. Apart from this its a very holy place for worship.
Anja Fuchs (2 years ago)
Bezaubernder Ort der Ruhe, direkt am Markt
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