Larochette Castle Ruins

Larochette, Luxembourg

Larochette Castle stands high above the town of Larochette. Dating from the 11th century, the castle was destroyed by fire at the end of the 16th century. The earliest references to the castle are from the end of the 11th century and during the 12th century when the lords of Larochette were flag bearers for the counts of Luxembourg. The family proliferated leading to the construction of the five stately houses which are separate from the main structure. They include the Homburg Manor (1350) and the Créhange Manor (1385) both of which have now been restored. The Verlorenkost (literally Lost Food) watchtower also stands alone on the south side. The legend goes that the cook was carrying pots full of food when she stumbled, breaking everything.

Since its acquisition by the State of Luxembourg in 1979, some restoration work has been undertaken. The castle is open to the public in summer season.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Ruins in Luxembourg

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Olaf chalmer (3 years ago)
Beautiful ruin, a must see and the town is famous for its thermal!
Tim Lord (4 years ago)
Amazing time with the family, the view is breathtaking and well worth seeing if you are in the area. The road towards the castle is one car only with a few passing places en route - a bit tricky if you are in a motorhome like we were! When you are there though, make sure you explore fully as there are lots of hidden areas that are just off the main track. Everything is very safe so no issues with the height! Well worth getting a picture of the castle from the town below so you can see it at scale! You can drive down or there is a walking path to the left of the castle entrance.
gigasvenom (4 years ago)
Interesting place to visit. The ruins of the castle sit atop a huge rockface and it's a fair hike up to there from either Larochette or via the woodland behind the castle. We managed it with our 3 young kids plus a buggy and rucksack of supplies. All areas are accessible and the views over Larochette and beyond are impressive. There remains an empty well within the ruins, which must be at least 20 metres deep. Rooms consist of old works of art, depicting scenes of life in the castle. There is a small gift shop, selling ice cream and, possibly, drinks. Gardens are well kept and there is the option to sit and relax there. If you like history, definitely visit here; even if not, it's an interesting site and keeps the kids occupied. We spent about an hour exploring the grounds.
Phil Sylvester (4 years ago)
Had a very nice visit to the castle on our drive through Luxembourg. It was an easy walk up from city center and the ruins from the 1300s were remarkable. There’s even a cafe selling drinks and snacks, and during our visit an art exhibition in the remaining manor that is still standing.
Yassen Todorov (4 years ago)
A real nice view and walk. Choose a sunny spring day, and be rewarded with a green serene view of he ruins, and a part of the building shown the medieval way of living. Walk through the ruins, take a stroll to the town, or simply enjoy a coffee at the castle. This is one of my favourite destinations in Luxembourg
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