Hesperange Castle Ruins

Hesperange, Luxembourg

Hesperange Castle probably dates from the early 13th century when the Counts of Luxembourg gave Hesperange to the Lords of Rodenmacher who sided with the French when the Burgundians conquored Luxembourg in 1443. Maximilian of Austria dismantled the castle in 1480 and 1482 after battles with Gerard of Rodenmacher. In 1492, he transferred it to the Lords of Baden who had to pawn it in 1692 and could only reclaim it in 1740.

After the French captured the castle in 1796, the French government nationalized it and sold it by auction in 1798. Later parts of the ruins were sold individually and by 1820 seven houses stood on the castle grounds. Now a national monument, the ruins are still privately owned.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Luxembourg

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Антония Арутюнян (15 months ago)
Not much accessible. Good looking, but same as if you passing by car or bike
Graham Gibbs (2 years ago)
Intriguing backdrop to photos from afar but unable to get close to it. No nearby information or anything.
Michael Lam (2 years ago)
What an amazing trip this was for me to see the remains of this ancient castle. My friend’s cousin apparently has a section of the castle as part of his home under some unique circumstances. It is still amazing to see such a structure semi intact and the history it represents. If you make it to Luxembourg, you’ve got to head here and check it out. Also nearby is the home of actress Vicky Krieps from the movie the Phantom Thread.
Thomas Mortimer (4 years ago)
Nothing really to see, nice geocache though. Not worth a visit unless you're in the local area
Thomas Mortimer (4 years ago)
Nothing really to see, nice geocache though. Not worth a visit unless you're in the local area
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