Luxembourg American Cemetery

Luxemburg, Luxembourg

The Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial contains the remains of 5,076 American soldiers who died during the World War II. On 22 occasions two brothers rest side-by-side in adjacent graves. Most of the interred died during the Battle of the Bulge which was fought nearby in winter 1944-1945. Situated between the two flagpoles lies the grave of General George S. Patton Jr. The cemetery is administered by the American Battle Monuments Commission. Under a US-Luxembourg treaty signed in 1951 the US government was granted free use in perpetuity of the land covered by the cemetery, without taxation.

Not far from the cemetery entrance stands the white stone chapel, set on a wide circular platform surrounded by woods. It is embellished with sculpture in bronze and stone, a stained-glass window with the insignia of the five major U.S. commands that operated in the region, and a mosaic ceiling.

German fallen from the same battle are buried in the Sandweiler German war cemetery, about 1.5 kilometres away. The design of the tombstones are dark stone crosses compared to white tombstones of the American cemetery.

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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jaka Meglič (20 months ago)
A quiet and moving place with great info on World War II.
pkaslik Carlik (21 months ago)
Very impressive and dignified place. I recommend visiting and remembering what they were fighting for.
Dianne Davis (2 years ago)
My husband and I were stationed in Germany in the 80's and visited this cemetery several times. When my parents came to visit us we brought them here. It was especially meaningful for my father as he served under General Patton during world war two. It is such a beautiful place and a peaceful resting place for our soldiers who paid the ultimate price.
World War Supply (2 years ago)
Somber resting place of American heroes. It contains the graves of those who died in the Bulge and the aftermath. General Pattom is there with the troops. Extreamly well kept and neat. Lots of 101 and 82 paratroopers as well.
Andrew Campos (2 years ago)
This is a cemetery where 5,075 service members lie in peace. It's also the resting place of George S. Patton Jr., General of the 3rd Army. The cemetery was established 29 December 1944. A treaty signed in 1951 between the United States and Luxembourg allowed the U.S to use land for FREE for the cemetery. Visit the chapel if you get a moment while visiting. This is a place of silence and respect for those who lost their lives to save millions.
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