Echternach Roman Villa

Echternach, Luxembourg

On the outskirts of Echternach is located one of the largest and richest estates of the northwestern provinces of the Roman Empire. The completely excavated manor house, measuring 118 x 62 m, was probably a palace. It had 40-70 rooms on the ground floor alone, provided with peristyles, courtyards, basins, marble facing, mosaic pavement and underfloor heating. This magnificent estate consisted of at least ten more buildings, which regularly lined up left and right of the estate wall and were discovered through aerial photographs and geophysical prospecting. Visitors can embark on inspecting the well-preserved basements, cellars and ornamental ponds of the estate, which resurrects in all its splendour thanks to numerous digital reconstructions. More than 70 medicinal and ornamental plants as well as a pergola covered with vines are displayed in a Roman garden.

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Founded: 0-200 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Luxembourg

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Margarita Kennedy Rohan (3 years ago)
Fantastic facility for children and families! Beautiful in the snow.!!
Margarita (3 years ago)
Wonderful walk in the snow, to the playground for children! Great fun!!
Roshan Fernando (4 years ago)
You should definitely check out the Roman Villa in Echternach. You can access the Vila by entering the parc in Echternach - Echternach Lake. I enjoy very much the walk around the lake too. I would recommend to tour around the Roman villa in summer time that way you can enjoy the Roman culture much better.
D.J. de Rijke (4 years ago)
Free entrance, big playground for kids, the museum with scenes is small.
Diego Beffa (4 years ago)
A lot of detail and information for free!
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