The Church of Pedersöre

Pietarsaari, Finland

The Pedersöre (Pietarsaari) church is one of the oldest in Ostrobothnia. There have been wooden churches from the 13th century and the present stone church was built 1510-1520.

The church was modified to cross shape in 1787-1795 by famous church builder Jakob Rijf. Pedersöre Church was damaged badly by fire in 1986. It was supposed to be an arson, but any suspects were never found.

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Details

Founded: 1510-1520
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matt Benton (2 years ago)
Miro Koivukangas (2 years ago)
Upea paikka
Jari Sundman (2 years ago)
Yksi Suomen vanhimmista kirkoista joka erottuu hyvin muista nuoremmista veljistään mahtipontisuudellaan, kunnolliseen tutustumiseen menee tovi jos toinenkin mutta ehdottomasti kannattava käynti.
Kåge Ahlsved (2 years ago)
Likarmad korskyrka i sten med ursprung från 1400-talet. Brand i juli 1985. Godkänd för 720 personer.
Virpi Ruokola (3 years ago)
Kaunis ja vaikuttava kirkko. Ehdottomasti vierailun arvoinen.
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