Orthodox churches in Estonia

Alexander Nevsky Cathedral

The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral is an orthodox cathedral in Tallinn. It is built to a design by Mikhail Preobrazhensky in a typical Russian Revival style between 1894 and 1900, during the period when the country was part of the Russian Empire. The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral is Tallinn's largest and grandest orthodox cupola cathedral. It is dedicated to Saint Alexander Nevsky who in 1242 won the Battle of the Ice on Lake Pe ...
Founded: 1894-1900 | Location: Tallinn, Estonia

St. Nicholas Orthodox Church

The church, with its twin bell towers and copper dome, was designed by St. Petersburg court architect Luigi Rusca and built in 1820-27. The main iconostasis is from the 19th century and the older ones in aisles from the turn of 17th and 18th centuries. Today the church is used by the Russian Orthodox Parish of Tallinn.
Founded: 1820-1827 | Location: Tallinn, Estonia

Uspensky Orthodox Church

Uspensky Church, which forms a uniform complex with a long priest house on the northern side, was built in 1783 and belongs to the early classical period. Uspensky Church is located in the same place as the St. Mary- Magdalena's Church of a Dominican monastery founded before 1300. The details of the building are typical of Russian early classicism. The interior of the church is relatively modest in terms of architecture. ...
Founded: 1783 | Location: Tartu, Estonia

St. Nicholas Orthodox Church

The Church of St. Nicholas with its two cupolas represents the late Classicism building style. It was completed in 1790 to replace the earlier wooden church. Interior is very bare with iconostasis made in 1700-1800s.
Founded: 1790 | Location: Kuressaare, Estonia

Pühtitsa Convent

The Pühtitsa convent is located on a site known as Pühitsetud ("blessed" in Estonian) since ancient times. According to a 16th century legend, near the local village, Kuremäe, a shepherd witnessed a divine revelation near a spring of water to this day venerated as holy. Later, locals found an ancient icon of Dormition of the Mother of God under a huge oak tree. The icon still belongs to the convent. A smal ...
Founded: 1891 | Location: Illuka, Estonia

Orthodox Resurrection of the Christ Cathedral

The Orthodox cathedral was built in 1890-1898 by the Kreenholm manufacture for its Orthodox labour. It was designed by architect Pavel Alisch. The great cathedral is made of brick and Finnish granite and has seats for 2000 people. The most prominent feature of its interior is the wooden crucifix (Architect Astafjev). The icons were painted by Michail Dickarev (Palech School).
Founded: 1890-1898 | Location: Narva, Estonia

Rakvere Birth of the Holy Mother Orthodox Church

The church of the Birth of the Holy Mother was built between 1898-1900 in the Old Russian style. The church contains the holy remains of the martyred priest Sergei Florinski, which are the only public holy remains in Estonia. The church is place for pilgrimage in the Russian Orthodox Church. Reference: Visit Estonia
Founded: 1898-1900 | Location: Rakvere, Estonia

Häädemeeste Orthodox Church

In the 1840’s, 80% of the people of Häädemeeste changed their Lutheran faith for the Orthodox one hoping, as a result of converting to the religion of the Russian imperial house, to secure for themselves a piece of land in return. Such calls were made throughout Estonia. The first Orthodox congregation of the neighborhood, the Häädemeeste congregation, was established in 1849, the church was read ...
Founded: 1872 | Location: Häädemeeste, Estonia

St. Alexander's Orthodox Church

A two-storey Orthodox church was built between 1914-1917. It is designed by the architect V. Lunski. Cupolas are inspired by the Old Russian church architecture. The church was reconsecrated in summer 2003. Reference: Visit Tartu
Founded: 1914-1917 | Location: Tartu, Estonia

Hellamaa Orthodox Church

The Orthodox Church of St. Peter and Paul was built in 1864-1866. The limestone church was built according the template design. Inside the church is is a memorial plate for Herman Aavi, the first arch bishop of Orthodox church in Finland.
Founded: 1864-1866 | Location: Muhu, Estonia

St. George Orthodox Church

The Orthodox church of St George in Paldiski is a typical example of sacral structures of its era - a stone church with classicist baroque roots, it was built between 1784 and 1787 and was consecrated at the end of that year. However, its history dates back even further: the Paldiski Apostolic Orthodox congregation is considered to have been founded in 1721, when a simple church was constructed here for the soldiers and w ...
Founded: 1784-1787 | Location: Paldiski, Estonia

Värska Orthodox Church

There has been a church in Värska since 16th century. The present St. George’s Orthodox Church was completed in 1904. The neo-Historical Orthodox church with a crossing cupola has a beautiful contrast between stones and brick cornices. The images of the iconostasis date from the time when the church was built. The famous Seto folk singer Anne Vabarna and the captain of the steamship Aurora Ivan Fjodorov have ...
Founded: 1904 | Location: Värska, Estonia

Paadrema Orthodox Church

The Orthodox church of Holy Trinity in Paadrema was designed by K. Niiman. Construction of the redbrick and unhewn stone church completed in 1889.
Founded: 1889 | Location: Varbla, Estonia

Angerja Orthodox Church

The Russian-style Apostolic-Orthodox Church of the Ascension of Our Lord in Angerja (Kohila) was completed in 1901. It is designed by V. I. Lunski.
Founded: 1901 | Location: Kohila, Estonia

Mustvee Orthodox Church

The Orthodox church of St. Nicholas was built between 1861-1864 and inaugurated in 1866. It was designed by A. Edelson. The interior is covered with mural paintings and icons from the end of 19th century.
Founded: 1861-1864 | Location: Mustvee, Estonia

Valga Orthodox Church

The Orthodox church of Saint Isidore was built between 1897-1898 and it was designed by V. J. Lunski. The church has five octagonal cupolas and represents the neo-classicism style.
Founded: 1897-1898 | Location: Valga, Estonia

Tahkuranna Orthodox Church

The Apostolic Orthodox Church of Dormition of Mother of God of Tahkuranna, completed in 1872, is, from the architectural point of view, rather rare in the Estonian context. For construction, red bricks are used without field stones, although in case of Orthodox churches they have traditionally been used together. In Tahkuranna Church was baptized the first Estonian President Konstantin Päts. Reference: Romantiline R ...
Founded: 1872 | Location: Tahkuranna, Estonia

Velise Apostolic Orthodox church

The Orthodox church of Velise was completed in 1889. The red-brick church is designed by the government architect Ervin Bernhardt. The richness of decoration which is characteristic of the Russian art of construction was toned down to fit in with the Estonian culture through the skilled use of colour contrast between bricks and fieldstones.
Founded: 1889 | Location: Märjamaa, Estonia

Lümanda Orthodox Church

The Orthodox Church of the Transfiguration of Our Lord in Lümanda was completed in 1867. The single-nave church with two towers is made of limestone. Nearby is a parsonage, which functions nowadays as a restaurant of traditional menu.
Founded: 1867 | Location: Kihelkonna, Estonia

Räpina Orthodox Church

St Zachariah’s and St Elizabeth’s Orthodox Church in Räpina was built in 1829-1833 to replace the previous one destroyed by fire in 1813. It represents a simple neo-Classical style. The iconostasis is made by old Russian masters, icons from Pihkva and Petseri.
Founded: 1829-1833 | Location: Räpina, Estonia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba

The Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba, also known as the Great Mosque of Córdoba and the Mezquita is regarded as one of the most accomplished monuments of Moorish architecture.

According to a traditional account, a small Visigoth church, the Catholic Basilica of Saint Vincent of Lérins, originally stood on the site. In 784 Abd al-Rahman I ordered construction of the Great Mosque, which was considerably expanded by later Muslim rulers. The mosque underwent numerous subsequent changes: Abd al-Rahman II ordered a new minaret, while in 961 Al-Hakam II enlarged the building and enriched the Mihrab. The last of such reforms was carried out by Almanzor in 987. It was connected to the Caliph"s palace by a raised walkway, mosques within the palaces being the tradition for previous Islamic rulers – as well as Christian Kings who built their palaces adjacent to churches. The Mezquita reached its current dimensions in 987 with the completion of the outer naves and courtyard.

In 1236, Córdoba was conquered by King Ferdinand III of Castile, and the centre of the mosque was converted into a Catholic cathedral. Alfonso X oversaw the construction of the Villaviciosa Chapel and the Royal Chapel within the mosque. The kings who followed added further Christian features, such as King Henry II rebuilding the chapel in the 14th century. The minaret of the mosque was also converted to the bell tower of the cathedral. It was adorned with Santiago de Compostela"s captured cathedral bells. Following a windstorm in 1589, the former minaret was further reinforced by encasing it within a new structure.

The most significant alteration was the building of a Renaissance cathedral nave in the middle of the expansive structure. The insertion was constructed by permission of Charles V, king of Castile and Aragon. Artisans and architects continued to add to the existing structure until the late 18th century.

Architecture

The building"s floor plan is seen to be parallel to some of the earliest mosques built from the very beginning of Islam. It had a rectangular prayer hall with aisles arranged perpendicular to the qibla, the direction towards which Muslims pray. The prayer hall was large and flat, with timber ceilings held up by arches of horseshoe-like appearance.

In planning the mosque, the architects incorporated a number of Roman columns with choice capitals. Some of the columns were already in the Gothic structure; others were sent from various regions of Iberia as presents from the governors of provinces. Ivory, jasper, porphyry, gold, silver, copper, and brass were used in the decorations. Marvellous mosaics and azulejos were designed. Later, the immense temple embodied all the styles of Morisco architecture into one composition.

The building is most notable for its arcaded hypostyle hall, with 856 columns of jasper, onyx, marble, granite and porphyry. These were made from pieces of the Roman temple that had occupied the site previously, as well as other Roman buildings, such as the Mérida amphitheatre. The double arches were an innovation, permitting higher ceilings than would otherwise be possible with relatively low columns. The double arches consist of a lower horseshoe arch and an upper semi-circular arch.