Orthodox churches in Estonia

Alexander Nevsky Cathedral

The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral is an orthodox cathedral in Tallinn. It is built to a design by Mikhail Preobrazhensky in a typical Russian Revival style between 1894 and 1900, during the period when the country was part of the Russian Empire. The Alexander Nevsky Cathedral is Tallinn's largest and grandest orthodox cupola cathedral. It is dedicated to Saint Alexander Nevsky who in 1242 won the Battle of the Ice on Lake Pe ...
Founded: 1894-1900 | Location: Tallinn, Estonia

St. Alexander's Orthodox Church

A two-storey Orthodox church was built between 1914-1917. It is designed by the architect V. Lunski. Cupolas are inspired by the Old Russian church architecture. The church was reconsecrated in summer 2003. Reference: Visit Tartu
Founded: 1914-1917 | Location: Tartu, Estonia

St. Nicholas Orthodox Church

The church, with its twin bell towers and copper dome, was designed by St. Petersburg court architect Luigi Rusca and built in 1820-27. The main iconostasis is from the 19th century and the older ones in aisles from the turn of 17th and 18th centuries. Today the church is used by the Russian Orthodox Parish of Tallinn.
Founded: 1820-1827 | Location: Tallinn, Estonia

Valga Orthodox Church

The Orthodox church of Saint Isidore was built between 1897-1898 and it was designed by V. J. Lunski. The church has five octagonal cupolas and represents the neo-classicism style.
Founded: 1897-1898 | Location: Valga, Estonia

Orthodox Resurrection of the Christ Cathedral

The Orthodox cathedral was built in 1890-1898 by the Kreenholm manufacture for its Orthodox labour. It was designed by architect Pavel Alisch. The great cathedral is made of brick and Finnish granite and has seats for 2000 people. The most prominent feature of its interior is the wooden crucifix (Architect Astafjev). The icons were painted by Michail Dickarev (Palech School).
Founded: 1890-1898 | Location: Narva, Estonia

Räpina Orthodox Church

St Zachariah’s and St Elizabeth’s Orthodox Church in Räpina was built in 1829-1833 to replace the previous one destroyed by fire in 1813. It represents a simple neo-Classical style. The iconostasis is made by old Russian masters, icons from Pihkva and Petseri.
Founded: 1829-1833 | Location: Räpina, Estonia

Hellamaa Orthodox Church

The Orthodox Church of St. Peter and Paul was built in 1864-1866. The limestone church was built according the template design. Inside the church is is a memorial plate for Herman Aavi, the first arch bishop of Orthodox church in Finland.
Founded: 1864-1866 | Location: Muhu, Estonia

Uspensky Orthodox Church

Uspensky Church, which forms a uniform complex with a long priest house on the northern side, was built in 1783 and belongs to the early classical period. Uspensky Church is located in the same place as the St. Mary- Magdalena's Church of a Dominican monastery founded before 1300. The details of the building are typical of Russian early classicism. The interior of the church is relatively modest in terms of architect ...
Founded: 1783 | Location: Tartu, Estonia

St. Nicholas Orthodox Church

The Church of St. Nicholas with its two cupolas represents the late Classicism building style. It was completed in 1790 to replace the earlier wooden church. Interior is very bare with iconostasis made in 1700-1800s.
Founded: 1790 | Location: Kuressaare, Estonia

Värska Orthodox Church

There has been a church in Värska since 16th century. The present St. George’s Orthodox Church was completed in 1904. The neo-Historical Orthodox church with a crossing cupola has a beautiful contrast between stones and brick cornices. The images of the iconostasis date from the time when the church was built. The famous Seto folk singer Anne Vabarna and the captain of the steamship Aurora Ivan Fjodorov have ...
Founded: 1904 | Location: Värska, Estonia

Mustvee Orthodox Church

The Orthodox church of St. Nicholas was built between 1861-1864 and inaugurated in 1866. It was designed by A. Edelson. The interior is covered with mural paintings and icons from the end of 19th century.
Founded: 1861-1864 | Location: Mustvee, Estonia

St. George Orthodox Church

The Orthodox church of St George in Paldiski is a typical example of sacral structures of its era - a stone church with classicist baroque roots, it was built between 1784 and 1787 and was consecrated at the end of that year. However, its history dates back even further: the Paldiski Apostolic Orthodox congregation is considered to have been founded in 1721, when a simple church was constructed here for the soldiers and w ...
Founded: 1784-1787 | Location: Paldiski, Estonia

Paadrema Orthodox Church

The Orthodox church of Holy Trinity in Paadrema was designed by K. Niiman. Construction of the redbrick and unhewn stone church completed in 1889.
Founded: 1889 | Location: Varbla, Estonia

Angerja Orthodox Church

The Russian-style Apostolic-Orthodox Church of the Ascension of Our Lord in Angerja (Kohila) was completed in 1901. It is designed by V. I. Lunski.
Founded: 1901 | Location: Kohila, Estonia

Saatse Orthodox Church

The stone church of Great Martyr Paraskeva was completed in 1801 and it is the oldest Orthodox church in Estonia countryside. The wooden bell tower was erected in 1839 and the church was enlarged in 1884. The iconostasis was brought from the another church in 1869.
Founded: 1801 | Location: Värska, Estonia

Tahkuranna Orthodox Church

The Apostolic Orthodox Church of Dormition of Mother of God of Tahkuranna, completed in 1872, is, from the architectural point of view, rather rare in the Estonian context. For construction, red bricks are used without field stones, although in case of Orthodox churches they have traditionally been used together. In Tahkuranna Church was baptized the first Estonian President Konstantin Päts. Reference: Romantiline R ...
Founded: 1872 | Location: Tahkuranna, Estonia

Rakvere Birth of the Holy Mother Orthodox Church

The church of the Birth of the Holy Mother was built between 1898-1900 in the Old Russian style. The church contains the holy remains of the martyred priest Sergei Florinski, which are the only public holy remains in Estonia. The church is place for pilgrimage in the Russian Orthodox Church. Reference: Visit Estonia
Founded: 1898-1900 | Location: Rakvere, Estonia

Velise Apostolic Orthodox church

The Orthodox church of Velise was completed in 1889. The red-brick church is designed by the government architect Ervin Bernhardt. The richness of decoration which is characteristic of the Russian art of construction was toned down to fit in with the Estonian culture through the skilled use of colour contrast between bricks and fieldstones.
Founded: 1889 | Location: Märjamaa, Estonia

Lümanda Orthodox Church

The Orthodox Church of the Transfiguration of Our Lord in Lümanda was completed in 1867. The single-nave church with two towers is made of limestone. Nearby is a parsonage, which functions nowadays as a restaurant of traditional menu.
Founded: 1867 | Location: Kihelkonna, Saaremaa, Estonia

Pühtitsa Convent

The Pühtitsa convent is located on a site known as Pühitsetud ("blessed" in Estonian) since ancient times. According to a 16th century legend, near the local village, Kuremäe, a shepherd witnessed a divine revelation near a spring of water to this day venerated as holy. Later, locals found an ancient icon of Dormition of the Mother of God under a huge oak tree. The icon still belongs to the convent. A smal ...
Founded: 1891 | Location: Illuka, Estonia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Royal Palace of Aranjuez

Palacio Real de Aranjuez is a former Spanish royal residence. It was established around the time Philip II of Spain moved the capital from Toledo to Madrid. Aranjuez became one of four seasonal seats of government, occupied during the springtime (from about holy week). Thereafter, the court moved successively to Rascafría, El Escorial and wintered in Madrid. Aranjuez Cultural Landscape is an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

After the Christian conquest, Aranjuez was owned by the Order of Santiago and a palace was built for its Grand Masters where the Royal Palace stands today. When the Catholic Monarchs assumed the office of Grand Master of the Order of Santiago, Aranjuez became part of the Royal estate. This fertile land, located between the Tajo and Jarama Rivers, was converted into the Spanish monarchy"s most lavish country retreat: during Spain"s Golden Age, Aranjuez became a symbol for the perfection of nature by mortal hands, as El Escorial was for art.

Such excellence was based on strong Renaissance foundations, as Charles V envisaged this inherited estate as a large Italian-inspired villa, a desire continued by Philip II who appointed Juan Bautista de Toledo to design leafy avenues that ran through the gardens and farming land. A series of dams was constructed in the 16th century to control the course of the Tajo River and create a network of irrigation canals.

The splendour of the estate was only enhanced by the Bourbon monarchs, who would spend the whole spring, from Easter to July, at the Palace. Phillip V added new gardens and Ferdinand VI designed a new system of tree-lined streets and created a small village within the estate, which was further developed by Charles III and Charles IV. As Ferdinand VII and Isabella II continued to visit Aranjuez during the spring, the splendour of this site was maintained until 1870.

The Royal Palace, built by Phillip II on the site of the old palace of the Grand Masters of Santiago, was designed by the architect Juan Bautista de Toledo –under whom construction began in 1564– and later Juan Herrera, who only managed to finish half the project. Although glimpses of the original layout still remain, the building itself is more characteristic of the classicism favoured by the Hapsburg monarchs, with alternating white stone and brick. The original design was continued by Phillip V in 1715 but not finished until 1752 under Ferdinand VI. The rectangular layout that Juan Bautista de Toledo had planned, and that took two centuries to complete, was only maintained for 20 years, since in 1775 Charles III added two wings onto the Palace.

Real Casa del Labrador

As the Prince of Asturias, Charles IV was a frequent visitor to the pier pavilions built by Ferdinand VI and grew up playing in the Prince’s Garden. When he became King, he decided to build a new country house at the far end of these gardens, known as the Casa del Labrador (the labourer"s house) due to its modest exterior that was designed to heavily contrast the magnificent internal decor. It was built by chief architect Juan de Villanueva and his pupil Isidro González Velázquez, who designed some of the interior spaces. These rooms, developed in various stages until 1808, are the greatest example of the lavish interior decor favoured by this monarch in his palaces and country retreats. Highlights at this Site include the combination of different types of art and the luxurious textiles, in particular the silks from Lyon, as well as wealth of original works on the main floor, where Ferdinand VII added various paintings and landscapes by Brambilla.

King"s Garden, the Island Garden, Parterre Garden and the Prince"s Garden

Phillip II, a great lover of gardens, paid special attention to this feature of the Aranjuez Palace: during his reign, he maintained both the Island Garden, designed by the architect Juan Bautista de Toledo, and the King"s Garden, immediately adjacent to the Palace and whose current layout was designed by Philip IV. The majority of the fountains on this island were commissioned by Phillip IV, while the Bourbons added other features such as the Charles III benches.

Phillip V made two French-style additions to the existing gardens: the Parterre Garden in front of the palace and the extension at the far end of the Island Garden, known as the Little Island, where he installed the Tritons Fountain that was later moved to the Campo del Moro park by Isabella II.

The Prince"s Garden owes its name and creation to the son and heir of Charles III who, in the 1770s, began to use Ferdinand VI"s old pier for his own enjoyment. He also created a landscaped garden in the Anglo-French style that was in fashion at the time and which was directly influenced by Marie Antoinette"s gardens at the Petit Trianon. Both Juan de Villanueva and Pablo Boutelou collaborated in the design of this garden.