Munsterkerk, built in the 13th century, is the most important example of Late Romanesque architecture in the Netherlands. It was built as part of Cistercian Munster Abbey, a nunnery founded around 1218 by count Gerard III van Gelre.

The oldest part of the church is a choir which was influenced by German cathedrals in Cologne, Speyer etc. The nave was probably built between 1220 and 1244. The church was restored by Pierre Cuypers in second half of the 19th century. The two towers erected during the restoration were damaged by earthquake in 1992.

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Founded: c. 1220
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Annie Hocks (2 years ago)
Dat is moeilijk uit te leggen, van mij uit gezien, kom naar de kerk voor gebed , of om te bezoeken,is zeker de moeite waard.
Aleksander Sołtysik (2 years ago)
Marco Buijs (3 years ago)
Prachtige kerk met een schitterend orgel wat ik nog heb mogen bespelen ook!! Dank voor het vertrouwen!
Jan (3 years ago)
Mooie Romaanse kerk. In centrum gelegen. Geluid installatie tijdens diensten laat te wensen over. Parkeren kan in nabijgelegen Q-park de Orangerue.
Rasmus (3 years ago)
Beutiful Romanesque church with an impressive 13th century tomb of the count of Gelre
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